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In GNU/Linux, file access is restricted. Users don't necessarily have the same rights when it comes to deleting, executing or even reading files. In fact, every file contain data such as its owner, its permissions and other information which defines exactly what can be done with it, and by whom.

Note: GNU/Linux treats everything as a file. As a consequence, directories use the same permission scheme.

Understanding file permissions

In GNU/Linux every user has his own user account, and is a member of one or more user groups. Similarly, each file belongs to a user and to a user group. For restricting file access, GNU/Linux (and Unix in general) defines three different types of rights:

- Read (symbolized by the letter r), which means that the file can be read;
- Write (symbolized by the letter w), which means that the content of the file can be changed;
- Execute (symbolized by the letter x), which means that the file can be executed.

For each file, each of these rights (Read, Write and Execute) are defined for three sets of users :

- The user (symbolized by the letter u), who is the owner of the file.
- The group (symbolized by the letter g), who represents all the users who are members of the group which the file belongs to (as a file belongs both to a user, and a user group).
- The others (symbolized by the letter o), who basically represent all the users that are neither members of the group nor the owner of the file.

For instance, if a file belongs to George (as the owner) and Administrators (as the group), it can define different Read, Write and Execute permissions for George, for members of the "Administrators" group, and for all other users.

Reading file permissions : ls -l

All information related to file permissions is contained within the file and can be viewed by the "ls -l" command:

ls -l myfile
-rwxr-x---  1 george administrators 10 2006-03-09 21:31 myfile

As you can see in this example, the "ls -l" command gives a lot of information about the file "myfile":

- Its name, "myfile";
- Its permissions, "-rwxr-x---";
- Its owner, "george";
- Its group, "administrators";
- And other information which is not relevant to this article.

The way permissions are shown can seem a bit confusing if you're new to GNU/Linux or Unix, but don't be mistaken, it is very simple. The first character simply indicates the type of file as indicated in the table below:

Character Type of file
- regular file
d directory
lsymbolic link
ssocket
pnamed pipe
ccharacter device file (unbuffered)
bblocked device file (buffered)

In this case myfile is a regular file. Let's have a look at the other nine characters: "rwxr-x---".

The first three characters indicate whether or not the read, write and execute permissions are given to the owner (in this case, George). If they are, their character representation appear (r, w or x), otherwise they are replaced by the character "-". In the same manner, the next three characters indicate whether or not these permissions are given to the group (in this case, Administrators). Finally, the last three characters indicate whether the same rights are given to the others (in this case, people who are not members of the Administrators group).

Letter Permission
rRead
wWrite
xExecute, Go through (for directories)
-No permission

 

Letter Type of users
u User (owner of the file)
g Group (group to which belong the file)
o Other (users who are neither a member of the Group nor the owner of the file)
a All (everybody)

So, in our example myfile features the following set of permissions : "

rwxr-x---
". This means that George has all three rights on it, that members of the Administrators group can only read (R) and execute (X) the file, and that everybody else can't do anything with the file.

You could imagine that this file, written and maintained by George could be an executable script dedicated to the administrators and not made available to other users.. but hey.. this is only an example, so let's not assume too much :) The important thing is that you now understand the concept of file permissions and that you know how to read them using the "ls -l" command. The next step is to learn how to change them.

Changing file permissions : chmod

You can change the permissions of your files (or other people's files if you're the root superuser) by using the command "chmod". The syntax is very simple. For instance if George decides to give write permissions to the administrators, he will type:

chmod g+w myfile

g represents the group of the file (administrators).
w represents the write permission.
+ represents the fact that the permission is added.

If George then lists the permissions using ls -l he obtains:

ls -l myfile
-rwxrwx---  1 george administrators 10 2006-03-09 21:31 myfile

As you can see, the administrators now have write access to the file, and permission to change its content.

The "chmod" command takes 4 parameters:

- The type of users to apply the change of permissions for (u for user, g for group, o for others, a combination of them or a for all three of them).
- The type of change to make (+ to add permissions, - to remove permissions, = to define permissions)
- The type of permissions to apply the change with (r for read, w for write, x for execute)
- The file or group of files to apply the change on (filename for a precise file, but wildcard characters for multiple files)

Let's have a look at a few examples:

- chmod o+r myfile adds read permission to the others on myfile;
- chmod ug+rx myfile adds read and execute permissions to both the owner (user) and the group on myfile;
- chmod a-rwx myfile removes all permissions to everybody (all) on myfile;
- chmod a=rx *.txt defines permissions to be read and write to everybody on all files suffixed by .txt.

The chmod command also accepts another syntax which is quite popular among system administrators: the octal system. Rather than using letters such as u, g, o, a, r, w and x.. you can use octal numbers. The main advantage is that once you're used to it, it is faster to use. Also, because it sets permissions rather than adding or removing them, you don't accidentally overlook anything. Here is how the octal numbers work:

Each permission is given a value:

Permission Value
- 0
x 1
w 2
r 4

Values add up when you combine permissions. Consequently the total value can go from 0 (no permission at all) to 7 (full permissions):

Permission Value
--- 0
--x 1
-w- 2
-wx 3
r-- 4
r-x 5
rw- 6
rwx 7

 

Finally a value is given for each of the three types of users (User, Group and Other) and these three numbers ranging from 0 to 7 are put together to form the octal number. This is the number you can use with "chmod".

For instance:

chmod 750 myfile

750 means 7 (rwx) for the owner, 5 (r-x) for the group and 0 (---) for others. As a result, the permissions of myfile will be "rwxr-x---". As seen above this command is equivalent to:

chmod u=rwx,g=rx myfile; chmod o-rwx myfile;  

Here are some common uses of the octal numbers:

- chmod 755 myfile : rwxr-xr-x, all rights to the owner, other people only read and execute;
- chmod 644 myfile : rw-r--r--, owner car read and write, other people only read;
- chmod 777 myfile : can be considered bad practice in some cases, full permissions to everybody.

Changing file owner or group : chown, chgrp

You can give ownership of your files to somebody else, or change the group that they belong to, by using the commands "chown" and "chgrp". "chown" allows you yo change the owner of the file, and "chgrp" allows you to change its group.

For instance, if George decides to give ownership of myfile to Robert, he can simply type:

chown robert myfile

Also, if Robert later on decides to make the file only available to members of the group "SeniorAdmin" group rather than to those of the group "Administrators", he can type:

chgrp senioradmin myfile

Note: The "chown" command also allows to change the group ownership. In fact George could have directly typed the following command:

chown robert:senioradmin myfile

Setting the sticky bit on a directory : chmod +t

If you have a look at the /tmp permissions, in most GNU/Linux distributions, you'll see the following:

clem@pluto:/$ ls -l | grep tmp
drwxrwxrwt   10 root root  4096 2006-03-10 12:40 tmp

The "t" in the end of the permissions is called the "sticky bit". It replaces the "x" and indicates that in this directory, files can only be deleted by their owners, the owner of the directory or the root superuser. This way, it is not enough for a user to have write permission on /tmp, he also needs to be the owner of the file to be able to delete it.

In order to set or to remove the sticky bit, use the following commands:

chmod +t tmp
chmod -t tmp

Setting the SGID attribute on a directory : chmod g+s

If the SGID (Set Group Identification) attribute is set on a directory, files created in that directory inherit its group ownership. If the SGID is not set the file's group ownership corresponds to the user's default group.

In order to set the SGID on a directory or to remove it, use the following commands:

chmod g+s directory
chmod g-s directory

When set, the SGID attribute is represented by the letter "s" which replaces the "x" in the group permissions:

ls -l directory
drwxrwsr-x  10 george administrators  4096 2006-03-10 12:50 directory

Setting SUID and SGID attributes on executable files : chmod u+s, chmod g+s

By default, when a user executes a file, the process which results in this execution has the same permissions as those of the user. In fact, the process inherits his default group and user identification.

If you set the SUID attribute on an executable file, the process resulting in its execution doesn't use the user's identification but the user identification of the file owner.

For instance, consider the script myscript.sh which tries to write things into mylog.log :

ls -l
-rwxrwxrwx  10 george administrators  4096 2006-03-10 12:50 myscript.sh
-rwxrwx---  10 george administrators  4096 2006-03-10 12:50 mylog.log

As you can see in this example, George gave full permissions to everybody on myscript.sh but he forgot to do so on mylog.log. When Robert executes myscript.sh, the process runs using Robert's user identification and Robert's default group (robert:senioradmin). As a consequence, myscript fails and reports that it can't write in mylog.log.

In order to fix this problem George could simply give full permissions to everybody on mylog.log. But this would make it possible for anybody to write in mylog.log, and George only wants this file to be updated by his myscript.sh program. For this he sets the SUID bit on myscript.sh:

chmod u+s myscript.sh

As a consequence, when a user executes the script the resulting process uses George's user identification rather than the user's. If set on an executable file, the SUID makes the process inherit the owner's user identification rather than the one of the user who executed it. This fixes the problem, and even though nobody but George can write directly in mylog.log, anybody can execute myscript.sh which updates the file content.

Similarly, it is possible to set the SGID attribute on an executable file. This makes the process use the owner's default group instead of the user's one. This is done by:

 chmod g+s myscript.sh 

By setting SUID and SGID attributes the owner makes it possible for other users to execute the file as if they were him or members of his default group.

The SUID and GUID are represented by a "s" which replaces the "x" character respectively in the user and group permissions:

chmod u+s myscript.sh
ls -l
-rwsrwxrwx  10 george administrators  4096 2006-03-10 12:50 myscript.sh
chmod u-s myscript.sh
chmod g+s myscript.sh
ls -l
-rwxrwsrwx  10 george administrators  4096 2006-03-10 12:50 myscript.sh

Setting the default file creation permissions : umask

When a file is created, its permissions are set by default depending on the umask setting. This value is usually set for all users in /etc/profile and can be obtained by typing:

umask

The default umask value is usually 022. It is an octal number which indicates what rights will be removed by default to all new files. For instance, 022 indicates that write permissions will not be given to group and other.

By default, and with a umask of 000, files get mode 666 and directories get mode 777. As a result, with a default umask value of 022, newly created files get a default mode 644 (666 - 022 = 644) and directories get a default mode 755 (777 - 022 = 755).

In order to change the umask value, simply use the umask command and give it an octal number. For instance, if you want all new directories to get permissions rwxr-xr--- and files to get permissions rw-r----- by default (modes 750 and 640), you'll need to use a umask value which removes all rights to other, and write permissions to the group : 027. The command to use is:

umask 027
 
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Comments about this article
Security Warning
writen by: Scott on 2006-04-05 16:36:01
Be very careful when using SUID/SGID. If you follow the instructions above, then any user can become you and take full controll of whatever you can do, since the SUID file is world-writable. Imagine what would happen if the file were owned by root! No one should use SUID/SGID without a [b]thourough[/b] understanding of the security implications.
RE: Security Warning written by Scott:
useful
writen by: Ashish on 2006-04-06 11:33:05
quite good in content. the last part was new to me
RE: useful written by Ashish:
mr.
writen by: Anatoly on 2006-04-07 02:56:04
please, correct the article, to change line "ls -l | grep tmp" to "ls -ld tmp" , it's no good to teach people to bad behaviour... thanks
RE: mr. written by Anatoly:
what is the 10, and what is the 4096?
writen by: Rich on 2006-04-07 17:33:12
clem@pluto:/$ ls -l | grep tmp drwxrwxrwt [b]10[/b] root root [b]4096[/b] 2006-03-10 12:40 tmp
RE: what is the 10, and what is the 4096? written by Rich:
answers
writen by: Lauri on 2006-04-09 08:59:39
I recommend you use ls -l tmp instead of pipes 10 tells that the folder tmp/ contains 10 files and 4096 is the size of the file
RE: answers written by Lauri:
its like this...
writen by: lewis donofrio on 2006-04-09 16:17:03
the 10 is 'link count' or how many files are inside that dir, and the 4096 is the size of the files (I believe)
RE: its like this... written by lewis donofrio:
10 and 4096
writen by: Chris on 2006-04-09 16:35:01
10 are the number of symbolic links where this dir/file pointed to, and 4096 is the size in byte.
RE: 10 and 4096 written by Chris:
Typo?
writen by: Florian on 2006-04-12 16:19:57
About half way through the article is this line... [i] - chmod a=rx *.txt defines permissions to be read and write to everybody on all files suffixed by .txt.[/i] Wouldn't it be a=rw instead for write?
RE: Typo? written by Florian:
yup
writen by: Blitze105 on 2006-06-07 03:45:21
typos happen. Excellent guide, i bought a book on linux just to see if it was for me and i thought after i read about half the book that i would never get it.. my advice to you is this: write a book make money you taught me more than about 450 pages of that moron's writing :D
RE: yup written by Blitze105:
Administrator
writen by: Pravat on 2006-10-27 00:45:04
[b]Damn good for newbies...[/b]
RE: Administrator written by Pravat:
umask
writen by: Heiko Rommel on 2006-11-29 10:38:12
In the explanation of umask above I read "666 - 022 = 644" That's ok if you subtract from 777 or 666 (that's where umask starts), but the notion is somewhat misleading. I think it would be better to use the symbolic names like "umask u=rwx,g=rx,o=x" for "umask 0026" For displaying the current settings, use "umask -S" In addition, the use of the symbolic names is more like positive thinking since it expresses what rights you want to give to users/groups/others in contrast to what rights you want to take away ;)
RE: umask written by Heiko Rommel:
typo ?
writen by: Izwalito on 2007-01-08 10:54:48
Last chapter reads: [quote]For instance, if you want all new directories to get permissions rwxr-x[b]r[/b]--- and files to get permissions rw-r----- by default (modes 750 and 640),[/quote] Seems to me that 'r' is a typo and should be ignored. you can tell sumthing wrong cause there are 10 characters instead of 9, and you can tell that 'r' shouldn't be there by crosscheking mode 750 with octal values shown before in the article. that said, this is a nice simple article that covers pretty much everything one needs to know to understand file permissions. kudos.
RE: typo ? written by Izwalito:
thx
writen by: Sheik on 2007-01-12 22:25:12
Omg thank you so much. This is one of those things that would be covered in some 500 page book that I would never understand. You have told me everything i need to know and saved me countless hours of screwing around. Thanks heaps :D
RE: thx written by Sheik:
Permission
writen by: Jitendra on 2007-01-19 06:19:51
RE: Permission written by Jitendra:
need help
writen by: saurav on 2007-02-06 21:58:04
1. a umask that would give no permissions (r, w, and x) to group users and other users. 2. perl script that submits messages (you can use any example messages) to syslog with facility “user”. (May require root access) 3. Perl script which goes through the password file /etc/passwd entries one by one and points out possible problems. The potential problems to check for are: • Find any entries that have UID 0; • Find any entries that have no password (need to access /etc/shadow) • Find any set of entries that have duplicate UIDs • Find any set of entries that have duplicate login names • Find any entries that have no expiration date (need to access /etc/shadow) After you finish this perl script and test that it works correctly, use cron to schedule this script to run at 3:00am everyday. By default, you will get an email each time your cron job runs. Configure the crontab file to disable this feature (i.e., do not send emails). 4. Using man pages for du, sort, and head commands as references, write a perl script that determines which 10 directories have the largest file space usage on your system. 5. perl script that finds all the hard links on a filesystem.
RE: need help written by saurav:
n00b external drive permissions
writen by: joji sri bananaramananda on 2007-02-14 03:12:49
Greetings all. I have just started running ubuntu and occasionally dyne:bolic on my toshiba satallitepro 6100, after years of abusing myself with micro$oft crap. My Western Dig. external drive has always been in the old pooey system, and has an ntfs filesys. i totally bailed on using any MS poo, and now when i want to reorganize and do upkeep and save new files on the External HD, I of course get write-protect/read-only errors. to do anything other than read-only, i must go find a MS-running system. boring! Q:can i change this from within my linux platforms and/or linux command shell? and how? any help greatly appreciated!
RE: n00b external drive permissions written by joji sri bananaramananda:
RE: n00b external drive permissions
writen by: disccomp on 2009-12-09 15:08:11
I've had the same problem in past; Be sure the NTFS driver you are using is not READ ONLY, ntfs-3g for instance is a stable Read/Write driver.
Reply to disccomp:
Device Permissions
writen by: Osric on 2007-02-21 09:36:43
What do the rwx permissions mean when applied to device files?
RE: Device Permissions written by Osric:
Device permissions
writen by: me on 2007-03-08 22:05:26
RE: Device permissions written by me:
Loggin permissions violations?
writen by: Wojtek Grabski on 2007-03-18 08:56:07
Just a quickie.. is there a way to log failed file reads? I constantly run into problems due to specific permissions being pre-set by Plesk and would like to know what SPECIFIC permissions problems are encountered by php scripts running on the server. Something that would include date/time, file, attempting user info would be the most useful. Does the syslog store this kind of data? Thanks.
RE: Loggin permissions violations? written by Wojtek Grabski:
File permissions problem
writen by: Pedro Ordonez on 2007-03-22 19:43:12
I am in trouble, please help. I installed Suse 10.2 but I have a SATA dirve that was giving me trouble configuring GRUB so I unplugged it and installed Linux. Now I can boot from both drives, but could not access the files on the SATA because it was not mounted. I mounted it but the permissions are dr-x------ so as root I cannot change the permissions for these files and I need the group to be able to have full acess. How can I fix this?
RE: File permissions problem written by Pedro Ordonez:
mad
writen by: jyotsna on 2007-04-27 05:12:04
RE: mad written by jyotsna:
file permissions
writen by: mbanks on 2007-04-29 14:57:57
RE: file permissions written by mbanks:
Don't buy a new external drive. Use syst
writen by: Mateus Denigris on 2007-05-04 16:25:33
RE: Don't buy a new external drive. Use syst written by Mateus Denigris:
I cannot modify the permission
writen by: anand babu on 2007-05-15 08:32:18
hi all, I am one of Linux lover. my probles is quiet simple but i am unfortunate to sole tat. my problem: i hav an 160 GB hard disk in my Dell Machine.... so i created a seperate vfat partition of 49GB(/dev/sda3) which is mounted as /backup for windows backup.... i copied some datas from my windows pc to this partition(/dev/sda3) thru winscp... My problem is " I cannot change the permissions of the files in /backup which is mounted in /dev/sda3" Solution 4 my problem will be much more appreciable... "Thanx in advance"
RE: I cannot modify the permission written by anand babu:
none
writen by: Bayard on 2007-07-16 23:24:27
From what I have read you can't change permissions for files in VFAT volumes.
RE: none written by Bayard:
report
writen by: vedakumar on 2007-10-04 06:03:57
RE: report written by vedakumar:
Teacher
writen by: mike on 2008-01-05 12:53:31
Hello, One of my students pointed out a useful video tutorial on file permissions for all those newbies. http://www.veoh.com/videos/v2078094HhAcWKp8 hope this helps. Mike
RE: Teacher written by mike:
RE: Teacher
writen by: disccomp on 2009-12-09 15:15:45
Correct URL: http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category/educational/watch/v2078094HhAcWKp8#watch=v2061669XeXtWJd5
Reply to disccomp:
Linux
writen by: john on 2008-02-21 11:27:22
RE: Linux written by john:
lin
writen by: michaek on 2008-02-21 14:39:16
RE: lin written by michaek:
hbighi
writen by: gufufu on 2008-02-21 17:05:43
RE: hbighi written by gufufu:
how we create a spicel permison on the u
writen by: gotam tyagi on 2008-03-12 08:35:40
sir
RE: how we create a spicel permison on the u written by gotam tyagi:
10 are the number of symbolic links wher
writen by: gotam on 2008-03-12 08:37:44
xdsd
RE: 10 are the number of symbolic links wher written by gotam:
permission
writen by: DEEPAK SHARMA on 2008-06-27 11:14:18
how to give permission to user
RE: permission written by DEEPAK SHARMA:
Mr
writen by: Pradeep on 2008-07-16 00:09:27
Hey guys, Can you please tell me if 1. "!!" means that the password is expired and the user will not be able to login? 2. "*" means that the userid is locked?
RE: Mr written by Pradeep:
How do I set the user of the public_html
writen by: Brian on 2008-08-26 13:48:26
Hi, What command do I use to set the user for the public_html? Currently mine looks like this: drwxr-x--- 5 username nobody 4096 August 22 public_html Thanks!
RE: How do I set the user of the public_html written by Brian:
linux beginner
writen by: faisal on 2008-09-21 12:24:22
RE: linux beginner written by faisal:
linux beginner
writen by: faisal on 2008-09-21 13:17:01
RE: linux beginner written by faisal:
writen by: Anonymous on 2008-12-08 19:17:10
RE: written by Anonymous:
writen by: Anonymous on 2009-01-07 07:57:52
RE: written by Anonymous:
app admin
writen by: Jason on 2009-03-02 12:50:05
I'm not sure if anyone else has mentioned this since I haven't read all comments but there's a typo in the last paragraph: "In order to change the umask value, simply use the umask command and give it an octal number. For instance, if you want all new directories to get permissions rwxr-xr--- and files to get permissions rw-r----- by default (modes 750 and 640),... " rwxr-xr--- should actually read rwxr-x--- if the mode should be set to 750 in this example. It looks more like 754 as is.
RE: app admin written by Jason:
it doesnt seem to work
writen by: doccpu on 2009-11-16 02:03:28
I have tried to figure it out for years. unless i am rooot i cant read or edit a file.
i change the permissions of motion.conf to root/motion rwrwr-
i ( david) am a member of group motion
but in gui i cant read or edit motion.conf. from a terminal Gedit says i have no priviledges to read or edit it. well hell ls-l shows rw-rw-r-- so motion has permission i am a member of motion. why cant i edit it?
dhorner at usa tod net


the gui says i am in the motion group but am i really?
adduser says The user `david' is already a member of `motion'.
so why cant i read or edit the file? :confused:
RE: it doesnt seem to work written by doccpu:
Gud article
writen by: mohiyadeen on 2010-03-14 12:19:30
It explains about SUID with a simple example...Thanks!
RE: Gud article written by mohiyadeen:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:27
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:28
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:28
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:31
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:34
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:36
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:40
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:42
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:43
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:48:44
hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:
owner cannot delete created or modified file
writen by: VidyaEvolution on 2012-08-17 05:50:05
Hello,

i am searching for a way to set permissions on folder and the contents. The rule is as such that the only the superUser can delete contents of the folder. Users can add, view, modify But NOT delete the files in the directory. Please tell me if you got any solution for this.

Thank you
RE: owner cannot delete created or modified file written by VidyaEvolution:

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