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i have a shell account at an ISP and wanted to install htmldoc. each time i make install the system tries to copy the binary to the usr/bin folder and ...
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  1. #1
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    make install to my home - shell account


    i have a shell account at an ISP and wanted to install htmldoc.

    each time i make install the system tries to copy the binary to the usr/bin folder and i get a "permission denied" message for obvious reasons.

    is there a way to make intall the binary to my home directory?

    thanks for your help.

    p.s. yes, i did specify --prefix my config.

  2. #2
    Linux User nalg0rath's Avatar
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    If I understand the problem correctly the following should fix it:
    Code:
    $ ./configure --prefix=/home/***/dir --bindir=/home/***/dir/bin

  3. #3
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    It does look and sound to me, as if you have a few things mixed up.

    As far as I have learned in the last few days about my own Linux OS, I conclude the following:

    1.) The folders /usr and /bin that you mention, are already in the home directory.

    2.) There is no such folder: /usr/bin. There is a folder /usr, and there is a folder /bin.
    These are two different folders.

    Further, I recommend, not having this work done by your ISP, but doing it yourself.
    That way, you have better control, can play around, experiment, go back and fore, try again, in a different way, till you got it right. And that would be much faster done, than if you have to correspond/communicate with your ISP, and sometimes you can't reach him within reasonable time.

    It is very easy to install/copy a document inside a folder: Choose first a good package tool. With this tool you should be able to do it.
    By doing these things yourself, you will learn a lot of useful things, so that you will mostly be able to do good and quick troubleshooting.

    A ISP could be good for storing data, instead on to your HDD, but a ISP might not be the right thing, for what you just are trying to do, and got stuck.

    Have a great weekend.

    Alexander

  4. #4
    Linux User nalg0rath's Avatar
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    Please don't take this as bashing, I just want to help you learn.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lordshooter View Post
    1.) The folders /usr and /bin that you mention, are already in the home directory.
    No, that is not right. The '/usr' and '/bin' directories are located in your root directory. The root directory is written as '/' only. This should not be mistaken for the '/root'-directory which is the home directory for the root user.

    Each user(in the normal case) has its own home directory, and they are located in /home. If you
    have the username 'me' your home directory would probably be '/home/me'.

    There can be a directory named 'usr' or 'bin' anywhere in the system, for example there's a bin directory in '/usr'. Though, when you write '/usr' or '/bin', you should be refering to the ones that are located in the /-directory (root dir), hence the preceding '/'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lordshooter View Post
    2.) There is no such folder: /usr/bin. There is a folder /usr, and there is a folder /bin.
    These are two different folders.
    In absolutely most cases a /usr/bin directory on Unix systems and definatly one on a GNU/Linux system. But there is also a '/usr'-directory and a '/bin'-directory.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lordshooter View Post
    Further, I recommend, not having this work done by your ISP, but doing it yourself.
    That way, you have better control, can play around, experiment, go back and fore, try again, in a different way, till you got it right. And that would be much faster done, than if you have to correspond/communicate with your ISP, and sometimes you can't reach him within reasonable time.
    With this I agree, often there are evens pretty strict rules of what you are allowed to do. In many cases you are not allowed to install programs in your home directory (security reasons).

  5. #5
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    thanks nalg0rath

    adding bindir args to config created the binary in the correct place - my home folder. thanks for your help!

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