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Hi all, just introducing myself and getting into Linux more and more. For over 10 years, I have had jobs doing programming in Windows environments (.Net mainly), but always dabbled ...
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  1. #1
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    New(ish) Linux User - story, plus questions!


    Hi all, just introducing myself and getting into Linux more and more. For over 10 years, I have had jobs doing programming in Windows environments (.Net mainly), but always dabbled in Linux for fun...

    I was recently given a work laptop (quite a high spec Dell) and what they have started doing with the laptops at work is to have a blank Windows 7 install and then run all required software on a virtual machine. A couple of weeks ago, the hard disk died and Windows was no more (thankfully I had been backing my work up on a pen drive).

    So, how does Linux fit into all this? Well, I had Windows and Linux disks lying around and my pen drive actually boots into DSL (my ultimate rescue tool).

    Next step, I don't just trust Windows and Dell diagnostics, so I want to check out the health of the whole machine. I get a 250GB USB2 drive and try to install Windows 7 (to replicate the original environment) - the installer says that Windows cannot be installed on an external drive. Oh well.

    I grabbed my Linux install CDs (I downloaded about 10 distros recently) and picked KUBUNTU for no particular reason really.

    Wow! It installed in 10 minutes on the External drive. It connected to my Wifi, updated the Nvidia drivers and basically ran very quickly. This is really impressive. I have taken out the internal hard disk and just boot onto my external at the moment. So the laptop is good still.

    So, now the question comes (sorry for the long first post!): Occasionally, I am asked to do some .Net consultancy, so I need Visual Studio from time to time. Is there a reliable way to run Visual Studio 2008 on Linux? I am thinking of using VirtualBox and installing either Windows 7 or XP (not sure which has the best performance).

    I do not need Windows as the main OS really if I can run a few things in a VM (I am doing a lot of PHP and MySQL now, so Linux can be used for that). I would love to know if anyone has any experience in running VS on a VM in Linux and how well it works!

    Thanks (I will try and keep posts a bit shorter in the future!)

  2. #2
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    Virtualization

    Ok, so I eluded to this in my introduction and got nothing but tumbleweed...

    In order to not need a Windows machine, I just need to be able to run Visual Studio on virtual machine. I am thinking Virtualbox...

    Wondered if anyone had done this... It is the one application that I need to keep Windows for at the moment, but have managed to move my programming, DB & multimedia stuff over to Linux.

    Games are obviously a factor and at the moment I have a powerful Windows box just as a games console really - that's fine, why the hell not?

    But for daily tasks, I am more interested in open souce software, so really want to have my main box running Linux.

    Any information and/or tips on running Windows as an occasional VM would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    S

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forums samsonite2010

    I have run a couple of versions of Windows in VirtualBox and most things work, but virtual hardware is used so some applications don't work properly.

    You could try a dual boot and make the Windows partition(s) just big enough for what you want. If you find running VS in a VM does not work then you have the system available without having to start reinstalling things.

    ... once you are confident everything works in the VM you can just use the Windows partition for storing data or reformat it to a Linux file system.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the reply. I will be sure to report back here with comments on the performance and reliability of Visual Studio running on a Virtualbox setup. I know a lot of Windows users that would like to get into Linux, but need their VS environment and that is their excuse for not trying!
    Last edited by samsonite2010; 04-14-2010 at 08:16 AM. Reason: Typo

  5. #5
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    Windows on Virtualbox works just fine for me. I use sun virtual box, but not virtual box OSE, because it doesnt support usb devices or file sharing between host and guest (cant remember exactly what it was)
    ive been using dual boot system for few years, but now VM makes everything a lot better mainly because i dont need to restart my computer anymore.

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