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Originally Posted by techieMoe I agree with most of your statements but I must take issue with this one. First of all, C# was created by Microsoft but it doesn't ...
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe View Post
    I agree with most of your statements but I must take issue with this one. First of all, C# was created by Microsoft but it doesn't just run in MS Windows. Due largely to two major developments (Microsoft making C# an ECMA standard and the development of the OSS Mono] framework as a drop-in replacement for .NET) you can develop and run C# programs in Linux. I'm taking a workshop on it as we speak, as a matter of fact.
    Interesting, I will need to look into that.

    For all your talk about being open-minded, your definition of a "coding language" is awfully strict. Does python or perl not count as a "coding" language simply because they use an interpreter? Do you consider C and C++ the only true "coding languages"?
    There may be some differences between the computer science terminology and the game programming terminology, but when we use it in computer science, a coding language is a language that is compiled into machine code that can be directly read by the processor. C++ is compiled into Assembly, which is then made into machine code.

    Scripting languages are languages either interpreted or compiled and then interpreted. I am not familiar with Perl, but Python would fit in this category, along with C# and Obj-C.

    C# was not developed from a "hacked version of Java." I believe you're mistaking it for J#. It does share a lot of the same syntax as Java, as well as the same kind of virtual bytecode interpreter, but it's far from a "hacked scripting language."
    The language itself is based off of C++, but the VM that it runs through is an edited version of the Java VM.

    I've not run into any significant performance issues using C# in Microsoft Windows or Linux. For desktop applications (and especially considering the relative speed and available memory of modern desktop machines) C# is just as viable a language as C or C++. If you want to write a command-line tool that deals with Linux internals or schedules a cron job then it's obviously not the ideal language, sure. However that doesn't mean it's never the right choice.
    Ohh no! I never said it's not the right choice, but games are played in realtime, and the game engine itself must be written in a coding language if you are going to make a game with high performance.

    The reason I originally suggested they steer clear of C# for this project was simply because C# is a very new kid on the Linux block, and the Mono project hasn't 100% implemented all the functionality that would be necessary for a cross-platform game engine. The code they would need to draw even two-dimensional graphics would be platform-specific and thus not port well between Linux and Windows. It has nothing to do with inherent deficiencies of the language.
    I did some research on how game engines work, and I think I have been misleading you.

    Most game engines use a scripting layer, which is what links things together. TORQUE uses TorqueScript, but the game engine itself is made in C++.

    Basically, an ideal game engine would be written in a coding language, but then linked together using a scripting language.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neotyguy40 View Post
    There may be some differences between the computer science terminology and the game programming terminology, but when we use it in computer science, a coding language is a language that is compiled into machine code that can be directly read by the processor. C++ is compiled into Assembly, which is then made into machine code.

    Scripting languages are languages either interpreted or compiled and then interpreted. I am not familiar with Perl, but Python would fit in this category, along with C# and Obj-C.
    Well, I have a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science and I write criminal justice software in Java for a living. This is the first time I've ever heard that particular separation of programming languages. Perhaps the CS curriculum has changed in recent years.

    Everything mentioned above can be considered a "programming language;" whether you want to further subdivide them into "scripting" and "coding" is up to you. I just find that dichotomy confusing and unnecessary.
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