Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 4 of 4
Hi All, New to this forum and also CZ. I was having a bit of a play today and I have two USB hard drives. One is 120G the other ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2

    CloneZilla -- Oooops!


    Hi All,

    New to this forum and also CZ. I was having a bit of a play today and I have two USB hard drives. One is 120G the other 160G.

    I was playing with the image back up and restore and it works brilliantly. I should have left well enough alone but no, I had to try "device to device"

    Well, I cloned the 120G to the 160 and now I have two 120G drives. No big deal I thought I will use GParted and straighten it all up and get back my 160G.

    Sadly GParted firmly believes that the former 160G is now a real 120G.

    What have I done and how can I fix it? Actually, I do not need to know what I have done, but I certainly would like to know what I need to do to fix this.

    Thanks

    Handel

  2. #2
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    7,864
    Hello and Welcome.
    Assuming you have made all the backups you need, I think an fdisk is in order here. You need to delete the partition would be my guess.
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTbob View Post
    I think an fdisk is in order here. You need to delete the partition would be my guess.
    Thanks for the welcome, but I cannot say the same for the advice. Using FDisk trashed the entire drive. When I tried to install the operating system it returned a message "Cannot have a Partition outside the drive."

    GParted, Clonezilla, and several other Partition managers all reported the same error message.

    I went to WD's site and downloaded a DOS .ISO with diagnostics and burned it to a CD. It would not run on the laptop so I had to install the dead drive on a desktop and boot the CD from that. A full scan returned no errors but then when I tried to partition it with GParted I got the above error again.

    I put it back in the desktop and ran the WD diagnostics again and selected "over-write the drive with zeros." That obviously fixed the partition errors. I was then able to install the OS.

    So, could I be so bold as to caution you on hasty suggestions when dealing with modern high capacity drives. Capacities that could not have been dreamed of in FDisk's days. Had I not been technically savvy enough and have the equipment to resurrect the drive, it could have been a very unpleasant experience for a less techy person.

    Handel

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    7,864
    Quote Originally Posted by HandelWithCare View Post
    Thanks for the welcome, but I cannot say the same for the advice. Using FDisk trashed the entire drive. When I tried to install the operating system it returned a message "Cannot have a Partition outside the drive."

    GParted, Clonezilla, and several other Partition managers all reported the same error message.

    I went to WD's site and downloaded a DOS .ISO with diagnostics and burned it to a CD. It would not run on the laptop so I had to install the dead drive on a desktop and boot the CD from that. A full scan returned no errors but then when I tried to partition it with GParted I got the above error again.

    I put it back in the desktop and ran the WD diagnostics again and selected "over-write the drive with zeros." That obviously fixed the partition errors. I was then able to install the OS.

    So, could I be so bold as to caution you on hasty suggestions when dealing with modern high capacity drives. Capacities that could not have been dreamed of in FDisk's days. Had I not been technically savvy enough and have the equipment to resurrect the drive, it could have been a very unpleasant experience for a less techy person.

    Handel
    I'm sorry if you had troubles on my part. You'll notice I left the actual commands blank, this was on purpose. I assumed you knew nothing about fdisk and left the actual command up to you. I assumed if you did not know how to use fdisk, you would have asked or at the very least, use Google to find the info. Deleting a partition should not have adverse effects on your drive no matter how new it is. Fdisk is old but it is still in use by all drive makers and almost every Linux distro. Glad you got it sorted out.
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help, Please keep it on the forums only.
    All new users please read this.** Forum FAQS. ** Adopt an unanswered post.

    I'd rather be lost at the lake than found at home.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •