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Hi, I have a PC-104 SBC running Linux. I am trying to access hardware registers using a routine written assembly language. Is it possible to do so? Is it possible ...
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  1. #1
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    General question about using assembly language code under Linux


    Hi, I have a PC-104 SBC running Linux. I am trying to access hardware registers using a routine written assembly language. Is it possible to do so? Is it possible to access hardware when an operating system is already running on it?

    Thanks..
    Last edited by rainbow82; 09-09-2011 at 05:22 PM.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    answers:

    1. Yes
    2. Yes

    What is the processor type you are using for the PC-104 board - ARM or Intel (compatible)?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Thanks for the reply. The SBC has AMD Geode LX (500 MHz)processor on it. It is Intel compatible.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I see that it is an x86-compatible CPU. How you access the registers depends a lot upon the operating system. If you are running Linux, you may need to put the hardware access into a kernel module that you can access from user space via an ioctl() call. I'm not sure if you can directly access the hardware from a user-space program. If you are running QNX, you can access the hardware directly from a privileged user program. In either case, you can use standard GNU compiler tools to write the software.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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