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When removing applications, is it more efficient when doing so in Linux than in Windows? Meaning, no complications arise because of missed ".dll" files (I know Linux doesn't use them) ...
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  1. #1
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    I have a question about Iinux and removing applications


    When removing applications, is it more efficient when doing so in Linux than in Windows?

    Meaning, no complications arise because of missed ".dll" files (I know Linux doesn't use them) but something to that effect.

    I found after years of using Windows, after uninstalling programs or something along those lines, problems would arise.

    Was curious if the way Linux was set up that it's more efficient and less troublesome.


    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Welcome to LinuxForums!

    Typically, so long as you use your package manager to do the job, the only thing that might be left behind is a configuration file.
    But these can be easily removed, as well.
    The method will vary slightly from one distro to the next.
    What distro are you running?
    Jay

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  3. #3
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
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    The approaches are different.

    While windows packages (mostly .msi today) contain everything an application needs (with the exception of frameworks like .net, etc),
    linux packages are much more dependend on each other.

    I believe this reflects the different pov towards software.
    Windows apps are leaning towards commercial use.
    You bundle a product.

    Not exclusively of course: I know there is freeware/open source for windows as well.
    What I am saying is: The packaging mechanism is geared for single apps.


    linux/unix apps require each other.
    For example: One of our latest packages we made as an RPM is Hiera
    Wonderful piece of software, but useless unless Puppet is installed as well.
    So our package Hiera requires the package Puppet.

    The package manager makes sure, the dependencies are fullfilled by downloading the appropiate packages in the right version and installs them.
    Note, that there is a general filesystem hierarchy.
    An app is not in one single directory, but rather its parts are in defined locations.
    - the binaries are in /usr/bin
    - the binaries requiring root are in /usr/sbin
    - the configuration is in /etc
    - ...

    This way, the different projects and applications benefit from each other.
    If a library gets an update/bugfix, then all the dependend apps are fixed as well.


    Coming back to your question:
    The linux tools for dealing with packages are quite mature and stable.
    If you de-install a package, all files will be removed. With the exception of data, config and logfiles.
    Staying within what your package manager and "repositories" provide guarantees an easy to setup/maintain work environment.
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

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  5. #4
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    Ubuntu 11.04

    So what programs would you guys recommend to clean up any residuals after uninstalling?
    There are a couple of applications that I couldn't get in Ubuntu Software Center that I got through a "deb" file outside from a website.


    Thanks for the replies, appreciate it.

  6. #5
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    apt-get is your friend.
    apt-get( - Linux man page
    https://help.ubuntu.com/8.04/add-app...roduction.html
    Lots of info in those links.
    Jay

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