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That one that lets you filter out unwanted updates that may cause instability in the system? And how can I get it, if it doesn't come pre-installed? Thanks....
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  1. #1
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    Question What is that color coding application in Mint's updater??


    That one that lets you filter out unwanted updates that may cause instability in the system? And how can I get it, if it doesn't come pre-installed? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Just Joined! Farmer Mike's Avatar
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    When you bring up the updater, click on EDIT in the menu bar, click on PREFERENCES and select the levels tab. If you uncheck the box under visible for level 4 (unsafe) and level 5 (dangerous), you won't see those levels. On my Linux Mint 13 Xfce installation, Levels 4 and 5 are not visible by default.

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    That wasn't actually my question. I was asking what the application itself was called, so I could use it on any system I happen to be using at any given time. I love this application because it simplifies the process so much.

  4. #4
    oz
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    Hello and welcome aboard!

    I don't run Mint so can't directly check the app that you refer to, but could it be Synaptic?

    Synaptic Package Manager - Screenshots

    It's a popular software installation tool used in many Debian and Ubuntu based distros that does give some color coding relating to packages if I remember correctly.

    Sorry if that's not it...
    oz

  5. #5
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    The update program is called mint-update. I don't know if it's Mint specific or not.
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    Close, but it's still not the program I was talking about. In fact, I believe Fusion Linux has even adopted the little feature, so I know it can't be exclusive to Mint. Besides just color coding update packages, the thing will display certain numbers with their respective colors. Generally, any update package labeled 1-3 will be okay to install on the system. I think updates with the '1' designation are green, while level '3' update packages are yellow. I forget what color level '2' updates are. Maybe blue? Dangerous packages that cause instability are color coded with orange or red, and are easily blocked by the settings. This comes up through the standard/default update process for Mint. I'm sorry my description seems a little vague, but I'm trying. If you can show me a picture of it, I will point it out.

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    The thing in the update manager that has the color coded numbers?

  8. #8
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    Question


    What is the thing in this picture that color codes and gives numerical marker designation to updates?

  9. #9
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    I would think that is part of the update manager functionality.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia (Linux Mint)
    Update Manager (mintUpdate): Designed to prevent inexperienced users from installing updates that are unnecessary or require a certain level of knowledge to configure properly. It assigns updates a safety-level (from 1 to 5), based on the stability and necessity of the update. Updates can be set to notify users (as is normal), be listed but not notify, or be hidden by default. In addition to including updates specifically for the Linux Mint distribution, the development team tests all package-wide updates.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    I would think that is part of the update manager functionality.
    Fusion Linux has it too, I think. Can it be installed on any system as an additional application?

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