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Thanks. But what is mesa?...
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  1. #11
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Thanks. But what is mesa?

  2. #12
    Linux Newbie
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    Jun 2012
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    100
    Quote Originally Posted by Garrett85 View Post
    Thanks. But what is mesa?
    It's comparable with DirectX in Windows.

    Mesa is a library implementing the OpenGL standard. In Windows, it's DirectX library's (DLL's) implementing DirectX. Hence the confusion :P .

    OpenGL and DirectX serve the same purpose: A graphics language for rendering 3D games.

    Nice thing about Linux, you can download a mesa git tree and compile it. And then only instruct TF2 to use that new version, keeping everything else in your system intact.

    So you only have to system-wide upgrade the kernel.

  3. #13
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    You said "Nice thing about Linux, you can download a mesa git tree and compile it. And then only instruct TF2 to use that new version, keeping everything else in your system intact." which makes it sound easy and convenient.
    Then you said "So you only have to system-wide upgrade the kernel." which sounds really hard and complicated.

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  5. #14
    Linux Newbie
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    Jun 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garrett85 View Post
    You said "Nice thing about Linux, you can download a mesa git tree and compile it. And then only instruct TF2 to use that new version, keeping everything else in your system intact." which makes it sound easy and convenient.
    Then you said "So you only have to system-wide upgrade the kernel." which sounds really hard and complicated.
    Please read the entire responce before acting.

    System wide upgrade composes basically two tasks:

    - Building git kernel:
    Code:
    git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git kernel
    cd kernel
    cp /boot/config-$(uname -r) .config
    make silentoldconfig
    make
    su -c 'make modules_install'
    su -c 'cp -v arch/x86/boot/bzImage /boot/linux-git'
    - Enabling git kernel in GRUB:
    Your current grub configuration contains stanza's, somewhat like the one below:
    Code:
    menuentry 'Ubuntu, met Linux' {
    	linux	/boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/sda2 quiet rw xt_recent.ip_list_tot=6400 xt_recent.ip_pkt_list_tot=1
    }
    First, let's make a copy:
    Code:
    su -c 'cp /boot/grub/grub.cfg /boot/grub/grub.cfg.bak'
    Above all those stanza's, create a new menuentry and like this:
    Code:
    menuentry 'Ubuntu, met Linux' {
    	linux	/boot/linux-git < kernel parameters >
    }
    The other linux line's that are generated by your distribution contain additional kernel parameters. I suggest you take those and copy paste them after this one.

    This part, handling grub.cfg, is actually the risky one. You risk putting in a menuentry line that does not work or that points to a kernel that does not work, but then you could just boot a different kernel and repair the damage. The other risk is that you make a mistake in grub.cfg syntax, in that case your box will probably not boot at all. Then you have to use a bootcd to copy the back-up back over the original.

    However, if you provide the contents of /boot/grub/grub.cfg to me, I can modify it for you. There is still a chance the kernel might not boot, but I will not wreck your grub.cfg so you can boot another kernel and undo the change.

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