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In Point Linux my system is on one sda partition, PL takes 8.53GB of space. Kali Linux has sda, sda2 and sda5 and takes up 19.84GB of space with sda2 ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Point Linux vs Kali Linux, hard drive space?


    In Point Linux my system is on one sda partition, PL takes 8.53GB of space. Kali Linux has sda, sda2 and sda5 and takes up 19.84GB of space with sda2 extended and sda5 swap using 3.98GB each.
    I'm kind of confused as to why Point linux and Kali Linux use the hard dirve in different ways since they're both Debian based and why I don't have an extended or swap partition under Point Linux? Seems like I should have but they don't show up under either gparted or gnome disk utility. So can someone give me some insight into this? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    In Point Linux my system is on one sda partition, PL takes 8.53GB of space. Kali Linux has sda, sda2 and sda5 and takes up 19.84GB of space with sda2 extended and sda5 swap using 3.98GB each.
    I'm kind of confused as to why Point linux and Kali Linux use the hard dirve in different ways since they're both Debian based and why I don't have an extended or swap partition under Point Linux? Seems like I should have but they don't show up under either gparted or gnome disk utility. So can someone give me some insight into this? Thanks.
    Linux can use as many partitions as you want. There are a number of directories which must be included in the root directory, but the rest of them can be their own partitions.

    Debian's installer gives you complete flexibility to use as many partitions as you want, even letting you manually assign as many custom mount points as you want.

    There is no requirement to use any extended or swap partitions. A swap partition is often recommended, but it's not required.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

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    If you have more than one Linux installation they can all use the same swap partition whether it is dual-booting or you have a dozen different installations. If sda2 is an Extended paartition, it does not contain anything but is merely a container for logical partitions such as sda5. In Linux, logical partitions begin with sda5 and sda1-4 are primary and one of the primaries is your Extended.

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    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    So Kali installed it's self in the sda2 extended partition instead of on the primary sda1 partition if I understand what I'm reading here. Point Linux, on the other hand, just installed it's self on the primary sda1 partition and it looks to not have a swap partition which is fine since I never even coming close to using the 2GB or RAM that I have installed so there's no need for a swap partition.
    Is that about right?

  5. #5
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    So Kali installed it's self in the sda2 extended partition instead of on the primary sda1 partition if I understand what I'm reading here. Point Linux, on the other hand, just installed it's self on the primary sda1 partition and it looks to not have a swap partition which is fine since I never even coming close to using the 2GB or RAM that I have installed so there's no need for a swap partition.
    Is that about right?
    No, both Kali and Point Linux installed themselves on sda1. The Kali installer also created a swap partition, sda5, contained inside an extended partition, sda2.

    Extended partitions are just containers for logical partitions; they contain no data in and of themselves. They were invented as a method by which you could have more than four partitions--because there's a limit of 4 primary partitions. The way around this problem was to invent a new kind of primary partition, the "extended partition", which is nothing but a container for multiple sub-partitions. These sub-partitions are called "logical partitions". The logical partitions are nested inside the extended partition. In this case, there's only one logical partition, but it's still nested inside the extended partition (even though it's the same size).

    It's easier to understand if you use a graphical partitioner like gparted. Then you can see how the logical partition is nested inside the extended partition.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

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