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Hi all... I have been running Linux for over a year now and have always had a problem with the mouse being way too sensitive to touch. I've been in ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User jkwilborn's Avatar
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    Adjusting mouse response and tracking speed


    Hi all... I have been running Linux for over a year now and have always had a problem with the mouse being way too sensitive to touch. I've been in the speed configuration and it's set to the 'slowest' value you can set.

    Having dealt with this ad nauseum, I'm hoping that someone will come up with a good way to do this, that works! I've seen many 'solutions', but none of them work.

    I've seen using 'xinput --list' used, but it's apparently not loaded and not knowing what I'm actually using seems to be a problem. I would prefer answers that let me read the docs and solve the problem instead of a quick fix as I'm sure next time I upgrade or change something it will be a problem again.

    Please send your suggestions for a fix and I will attempt to try them all. Please include some way to confirm that what I'm doing is working for the problem....

    Thanks to all, this is the best forum that I've found for fixing things, but I've noticed that many questions in this forum are unanswered.

    Don't know if it's required, but the mouse is an HP X4000 which is wireless, with a 30 month battery life.

    This is the ultimate in frustration....

    Thanks for all who even read this...

    Jack

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie nihili's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkwilborn View Post
    I've noticed that many questions in this forum are unanswered.
    this might be partly due to the fact that many help-seeking posters forget to include important detail - like for example what distro and desktop environment they are using.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    I would imaging no one has experience with that particualr mouse. Many mouse sensitiviy is configured by the mouse's own support software, but typically companies only make Windows versions of their software. HP's Linux support has a history of being spotty (they acquired Compaq who did support Linux some). So I would be contacting HP to see if they make a Linux support software.

    Have you tried another make/model of mouse to see if it's the mouse itself or just mouse support in the distro you're using. Over the years I've had similar mouse/touchpad issues and sometime only solution was using a different make/model mouse.
    A lion does not lose sleep, over the opinion of sheep.

  4. #4
    Linux User jkwilborn's Avatar
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    I understand there are many, but it would seem that a common interface would have been created or at least information on how to determine what desktop I do have. Having retired from the computer field, I find I cannot understand when I use a specific installation that all install are not the same, it totally eludes everything I've ever done in computers. Although I've used Linux (Debian, 3.2.0-4-amd64) for about a year and I've kept a notebook of different commands to find information, there doesn't seem to be a command for what desktop I'm using. Add to the that the option during login of 'default' and others are very confusing.

    I don't think I can confidently answer what desktop I'm using, without some kind of guide to how to find that out. Maybe that's what many are missing is that type of information. A good approach would be to do what the debug people use and that's a template of what needs to be filled in (better still a script that the user could run and populate the initial information.)

    I will look at HP's site and see if they offer anything for their mouse, but ever since I've had this OS my mice have always been way too sensitive. As far as I know I've tried all options, except this site and searching reports a couple, but none have any answers. Maybe nobody knows? I wouldn't even know what module does this interface or where to check...

    I posted a note on the HP site, as they seem to have nothing on Linux, via their search.

    I also tried the "echo $DESKTOP_SESSION" command and, as typical, returns "default", very useful. Other options seem to indicate there should be an 'about', that tells you about the system, I have not, as of yet, found that option.
    Last edited by jkwilborn; 05-17-2014 at 09:35 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkwilborn View Post
    I don't think I can confidently answer what desktop I'm using, without some kind of guide to how to find that out. Maybe that's what many are missing is that type of information. A good approach would be to do what the debug people use and that's a template of what needs to be filled in (better still a script that the user could run and populate the initial information.)
    (See Adding programs to menus and giving some root priv.)

    Quote Originally Posted by chris_inx View Post
    For Debian, the default DE is Gnome.

    As far as I know GNOME will stay the default DE debian.org
    Quote Originally Posted by chris_inx View Post
    Might work better with :
    Code:
    pidof gnome-terminal
    pidof lxterminal
    pidof [kK]onsole
    pidof [tT]erminal
    . My mistake !
    Quote Originally Posted by jkwilborn View Post
    on the first "pidof gnome-terminal" I got a number, so I guess that's the interface, gnome...

    Thanks, that answers that...

    Jack
    (end the quotes from Adding programs to menus and giving some root priv.)

    Quote Originally Posted by jkwilborn View Post
    I also tried the "echo $DESKTOP_SESSION" command and, as typical, returns "default", very useful. Other options seem to indicate there should be an 'about', that tells you about the system, I have not, as of yet, found that option.
    The reason why you get a 'Default' response from echo $XDG_DESKTOP_SESSION is because you installed the default desktop when installing debian and you are running it (for example, if you installed gnome at setup of debian, and later, you installed another desktop environment, such as KDE, then the XDG_DESKTOP_SESSION will return you a different value, according to the session of your choice that is currently running.)

  6. #6
    Linux User jkwilborn's Avatar
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    Found a resolution to the mouse speed problem...
    install xinput:

    Install 'xinput', I was doing this as root, so apply 'sudo' if required...

    Code:
    # aptitude install xinput
    Then show the devices:

    Code:
    # xinput --list --short
      Virtual core pointer                    	id=2	[master pointer  (3)]
          Virtual core XTEST pointer              	id=4	[slave  pointer  (2)]
          HP HP Link-5 micro dongle               	id=9	[slave  pointer  (2)]
      Virtual core keyboard                   	id=3	[master keyboard (2)]
          Virtual core XTEST keyboard             	id=5	[slave  keyboard (3)]
          Power Button                            	id=6	[slave  keyboard (3)]
          Power Button                            	id=7	[slave  keyboard (3)]
          HP HP Link-5 micro dongle               	id=8	[slave  keyboard (3)]
          Apple Inc. Apple Keyboard               	id=10	[slave  keyboard (3)]
          Apple Inc. Apple Keyboard               	id=11	[slave  keyboard (3)]
    Look at specifics for your device:

    Code:
    # xinput --list-props 9
    Device 'HP HP Link-5 micro dongle':
    	Device Enabled (115):	1
    	Coordinate Transformation Matrix (117):	1.000000, 0.000000, 0.000000, 0.000000, 1.000000, 0.000000, 0.000000, 0.000000, 1.000000
    	Device Accel Profile (242):	0
    	Device Accel Constant Deceleration (243):	1.000000
    	Device Accel Adaptive Deceleration (244):	1.000000
    	Device Accel Velocity Scaling (245):	10.000000
    	Device Product ID (232):	1008, 41991
    	Device Node (233):	"/dev/input/event1"
    	Evdev Axis Inversion (246):	0, 0
    	Evdev Axes Swap (248):	0
    	Axis Labels (249):	"Rel X" (125), "Rel Y" (126), "Rel Horiz Wheel" (239), "Rel Dial" (240), "Rel Vert Wheel" (241)
    	Button Labels (250):	"Button Left" (118), "Button Middle" (119), "Button Right" (120), "Button Wheel Up" (121), 
              "Button Wheel Down" (122), "Button Horiz Wheel Left" (123), "Button Horiz Wheel Right" (124), "Button Side" (237), 
              "Button Extra" (238), "Button Unknown" (235), "Button Unknown" (235), "Button Unknown" (235), "Button Unknown" (235)
    	Evdev Middle Button Emulation (251):	0
    	Evdev Middle Button Timeout (252):	50
    	Evdev Third Button Emulation (253):	0
    	Evdev Third Button Emulation Timeout (254):	1000
    	Evdev Third Button Emulation Button (255):	3
    	Evdev Third Button Emulation Threshold (256):	20
    	Evdev Wheel Emulation (257):	0
    	Evdev Wheel Emulation Axes (258):	0, 0, 4, 5
    	Evdev Wheel Emulation Inertia (259):	10
    	Evdev Wheel Emulation Timeout (260):	200
    	Evdev Wheel Emulation Button (261):	4
    	Evdev Drag Lock Buttons (262):	0
    set accel velocity (should be reciprical of "update frequency" times 1000) Mine was at 10 which is an update frequency
    of 100 so (1/100 * 1000 = 10). I could not locate the frequency of my mouse (HP X4000), so I guessed at 8KHz. Resulting in 0.125
    I set that and then the "Device Accel Velocisty Scaling" to get the proper speed (with a little tweaking).
    Code:
    # xinput --set-prop 9 245 0.125
    # xinput --set-prop 9 244 2.0
    This slowed my mouse down. You can read about these adjustments from the Man page of xinput. Hope you have success... I am setting this to 'Solved'...

    Jack

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