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I kind of fell in love with Kate when running Xfce with Kwin but found the combination a bit too heavy. I've moved to Xfce/Compiz/Emerald and am looking for a ...
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  1. #1
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Looking for an editor as good as Kate.


    I kind of fell in love with Kate when running Xfce with Kwin but found the combination a bit too heavy. I've moved to Xfce/Compiz/Emerald and am looking for a replacement for Kate. Geany doesn't do it for me; but the latest Bluefish is coming close. The problem is, I don't really know what I am missing from Kate just that I'm missing it Basic functions are a multi-language programmers editor that can be extended and has a good range of plug-ins.

    I'm thinking of trying emacs. Am i mad?
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  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    I kind of fell in love with Kate when running Xfce with Kwin but found the combination a bit too heavy. I've moved to Xfce/Compiz/Emerald and am looking for a replacement for Kate. Geany doesn't do it for me; but the latest Bluefish is coming close. The problem is, I don't really know what I am missing from Kate just that I'm missing it Basic functions are a multi-language programmers editor that can be extended and has a good range of plug-ins.

    I'm thinking of trying emacs. Am i mad?
    Trying emacs? Take it easy, or you'll drag us all into flame-hell. Seriously, though, it's very bloaty and so probably won't free you from the 'heavyweight' problem you're trying to avoid... not that I can talk, as I use Eclipse to work on php source code, and that's the grandaddy of all bloat. Can you do what you want with vim? I've never really learned how to use it properly, but it's real powerful and real fast.

    When I'm not using Eclipse, I use gedit/pluma to do quick and dirty code or config edits; I also use it when editing files across an ssh link 'cos it makes cut-and-paste between different servers a bit easier. In the Windwos world at work I use Notepad++, but I've never really needed anything quite like that in Linux (I've only missed the xml plugins it provides a couple of times in like six or seven years of writing php with xml).
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  3. #3
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    I use vi mostly but I think much depends on what you want from an editor. Both vi and emacs are idiosyncratic when compared to most modern editors but they are both feature rich. The key strokes popularized by windows are no where to be seen. I use a lot of different languages and find vi to work well. It does upon occasion tee me off.

    One editor I have used that I found interesting is Sublime Text. The free version features a periodic nag but it has some interesting features and is very customizable.

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregm View Post
    One editor I have used that I found interesting is Sublime Text. The free version features a periodic nag but it has some interesting features and is very customizable.
    +1 to the Sublime Text editor the developer at my last gig turned me on to it very nice and and configurable.
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  5. #5
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    You guys are smarter than me but I fell/stepped into

    jEdit - Programmer's Text Editor - overview

    and it aint too bad.
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  6. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Kate isn't that heavy in itself, but as part of KDE, it pulls in 193M of dependencies a situation that may improve when KDE Framework 5 is released. I like Komodo Edit and if it had the features of the proprietary and quite expensive Komodo IDE, it would be no contest!

    I do like vi for editing config files on a server, but didn't even consider it for every day coding. I might have to look at what plug-ins are available. I had never heard of Sublime Text and it does look quite good; especially version 3 which is in bets, but I can't agree to a license that implies the software phones home. That is a true abomination. OK, that's maybe a tad dramatic but I can't abide software that carries out that privacy invading practice! I've emailed their sales team with that query regarding their license and it will be interesting to see what or if they reply.

    I'm trying to do as much as I can using only FOSS and so far it's going well, not for any moral reasons but to see how far I can go. No closed binary blobs at all, no drivers, no flash and I've not noticed the lack. I even get HTML 5 on You Tube! I wonder if there's an open source equivalent to Sublime Text? I may be OK with closed source but not the phoning home.

    No flame wars here please, just sensible opinion and experience.

    [edit]I looked at jEdit a long time ago and seem to remember not liking it; or at least I didn't use it for very long. I can't remember why so I'm off to refresh my memory.[/edit]
    [edit2]That just saved me some time! I remembered that Linux Voice reviewed some editors and that jEdit was one of them. They couldn't get it working on Fedora so that's no good for me. Kate came first and Sublime came second (I forgot all about it being in there) so it's looking better and better![/edit2]
    [edit3]Couldn't resist it: jEdit: Lack of support, lack of working on Fedora and lack of looking nice relegate jEdit to the bottom slot. Also linked to LV as it's a mag that gives back to the free software community.[/edit3]
    Last edited by elija; 05-16-2014 at 11:22 PM.
    What do we want?
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    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  7. #7
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
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    Don't know if they have the features you need but will throw these out there. I've used Joe for years as command line editor as it is so easy to use. In Xwindows, I use Leafpad for light editing. When I need more, I default th Gedit. I used to use Kate and always preferred it.
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  8. #8
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Decided to try out Sublime Text as I was getting more and more curious. It's bloody brilliant, almost as good as Kate. If I can be assured it doesn't phone home then I'll probably treat myself to a license when version 3 comes out of beta.
    What do we want?
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    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  9. #9
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    I just saw this float past on /.

    Light Table

    It looks like it might fit this category, but I've not tried it out personally. If you give it a go, could you give us an idea of how good it is?
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  10. #10
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Not impressed. To simply change away from the hideous and headache / migraine inducing default theme you have to edit this

    Code:
    ;; User behaviors
    ;; -----------------------------
    ;; Behaviors are stored as a set of diffs that are merged together
    ;; to create the final set of functionality that makes up Light Table. You can
    ;; modify these diffs to either add or subtract functionality.
    ;;
    ;; Behaviors are added to tags, objects with those tags then automatically gain
    ;; whatever logic the behavior imparts. To see a list of user-level behaviors,
    ;; start typing a word related to the functionality you want in between the square
    ;; brackets (e.g. "theme").
    
    {:+ {
         ;; The app tag is kind of like global scope. You assign behaviors that affect
         ;; all of Light Table here
         :app [(:lt.objs.style/set-skin "dark")]
    
         ;; The editor tag is applied to all editors
         :editor [:lt.objs.editor/no-wrap
                  (:lt.objs.style/set-theme "default")]
    
         ;; Here we can add behaviors to just clojure editors
         :editor.clojure [(:lt.plugins.clojure/print-length 1000)]}
    
     ;; You can use the subtract key to remove behavior that may get added by
     ;; another diff
     :- {:app []}}
    by which time you have a full blown migraine.

    Additionally, extracting the archive gives an error that apparently doesn't stop the editor working but probably stores up a data losing time bomb for the users later enjoyment. Finally, the documentation website crashes my browser.

    It didn't even last ten minutes. Don't make me think about how to use an editor!
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

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