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Thread: "su" commands?

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  1. #21
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    Yes im serious. im on Slackware 9.0 on a full install. and i typed it letter for letter. like i showed you. if you wish i could even get a screen shot.

  2. #22
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    Are you using "su -" or just su when you su to root?

  3. #23
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    just su to root, im not familliar with su -

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  5. #24
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    That might be the problem. "su -" actually logs you in as root, while just su only gives you a subshell that runs as root.

  6. #25
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    hmmm in that case. when i do "su -" does it just do it for that terminal or for the whole thing.(logs me out and switches to root) if so how can i hmmm unroot?

  7. #26
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    No, that wasn't really what I meant. I just meant that it goes through the login process, ie. setting all environment variables correctly, invokes the shell as a login shell and so on. It wouldn't be able to log you out completely anyway. I mean, how would it go about to do that, after all?

  8. #27
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    Code:
    troy@slackware:~$ su -
    Password:
    root@slackware:~# kwrite /etc/lilo.conf
    kwrite: cannot connect to X server
    hmm now what?

    Code:
    root@slackware:~# cat ~/.bash_profile
    PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/usr/sbin:/bin:/usr/bin:/opt/kde/bin
    PATH=$PATH:/opt/kde/bin
    PATH=$PATH:/opt/kde/bin
    export PATH=$PATH:/opt/kde/bin
    thats what i get for
    Code:
    cat ~/.bash_profile

  9. #28
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    You probably don't have the xauth PAM module installed. I would have thought that slackware comes with it, but apparently that is not the case. Just to be sure, though, check if you have a line for pam_xauth in /etc/pam.d/su.
    You should install it anyway, since it is A Good Thing to have. I don't know what means of installation Slackware uses, though, so I'm afraid I can't help you get it.

  10. #29
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    Code:
    root@slackware:~# cat /etc/pam.d/su
    cat: /etc/pam.d/su: No such file or directory
    did i do that right? or is "cat" not the right command. or is my system just goofy?

  11. #30
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    -->
    TGZ is the package management. not sure if thats what you mean by means of installation but distrowatch tells quite a bit about Distros.

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