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Ok I have decided to go whit Slackware. So far I had been using Suse and Redhat. This is the first time I will get Linux that was not produced ...
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  1. #1
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    New grounds


    Ok I have decided to go whit Slackware. So far I had been using Suse and Redhat. This is the first time I will get Linux that was not produced by a big distributor. I am wandering what should I expect. It Slackware like suse and redhat where you just follow the step by step or is it much more difficult. Dose it install KDE right way or do u have to install. Just give me pointer on it before I start installing it.

  2. #2
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    slackware its a little bitharder to install.. you need to partition your drive before you begin the installation using fdisk or cfdisk. so you need to know a bit about what you're doing. the installer is step by step, its just not very graphical (like a bios setup really, thats the best way to explain it)

    kde can be installed automaticly, just make sure you select it to be installed.

    the main difference in running it that you will find is that the login is not graphical... you will be faced with a text based login and you will have to run kde yourself... (not hard, use xmwconfig to choose your default gui and then startx to start the x server, which will run kde or what ever you select)

    IMO slackware is a really good distro. I've learned more about linux from it than any other distro i've tried. It's also prooved to be stable and pretty streamlined.

    good luck

  3. #3
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    Dreamer has just about summed it up.

    It's fast, stable, but a little harder than what you are proberly used to.

    Slackware kick's arse.

    Something i will suggest... If your replacing your current distro with slackware on the same machine, then drop to a command prompt, and run "lsmod". Make a note on a bit of paper of ALL the items listed there. The reason for doing this is that the slackware kernel "bare.i" does not have a lot of driver support built in, so after install you will need to run "lsmod", then edit your /etc/rc.d/rc.modules file, and modprobe any extra modules which where in the "lsmod" from redhat but not in the slackware "lsmod".

    Hope that makes sense.

    Jason

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  5. #4
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    not hard, use xmwconfig to choose your default gui and then startx to start the x server, which will run kde or what ever you select

    ok can you say all that in steps

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    Ok I guess I did it wrong, but it was my first try. After running xwmconfig I setup to start at kde after that I ran startx and my screen shotdown. Os I know it was the monitor setting so I ran the xf86config and when through the steps and got no results. I guess I will have to run it again. I hear that people run it so many times that it toke them 3 day to get the best resolution. Well I just want a picture of kde for now

    Wish me luck

  7. #6
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    If you set your monitor and/or vid card up incorrectly in xf86config, then after the failed attempt of startx, you should get kicked back to text mode with some errors listed. These will help steer you in the right direction.

    With my monitor (VS E790), I found I had to enter the vsync and hsync rates manually. Just be careful you have the correct settings when doing this...
    \"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.\"
    Albert Einstein

  8. #7
    flw
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    Just be careful you have the correct settings when doing this...
    Which means you can damage your monitor with the wrong settings like your refresh rate. If you put a refresh rating in Hz lower than what your monitor is capable of, then it going to have monitor problems.
    Dan

    \"Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer\" from The Art of War by Sun Tzu\"

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