Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 9 of 9
I have been seeing many different programs that allow windows programs to run on Linix. I see Win4lin, Wine, CrossOver Office, and Cedega. All of them cost money except wine. ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    95

    Programs Tht Run Windows Programs


    I have been seeing many different programs that allow windows programs to run on Linix. I see Win4lin, Wine, CrossOver Office, and Cedega. All of them cost money except wine. Are these products better? Do they work well? I seems Cedega and Wine are for games while the others are for applications.

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Zelmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Riverton, UT, USA
    Posts
    1,001
    Wine is the general compatibility software for running Windows software on Linux. Cedega and CrossOver customize wine to maximize functionality of the software on their official support lists.

    In my experience using wine and Cedega, wine works just as well if you don't need to work with copy protection for a game.
    Stand up and be counted as a Linux user!

  3. #3
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    Quote Originally Posted by murph1083
    I have been seeing many different programs that allow windows programs to run on Linix. I see Win4lin, Wine, CrossOver Office, and Cedega. All of them cost money except wine. Are these products better?
    There are basically 2 classes of software that let you run MS Windows programs in Linux: the virtual machines and the proxies. Win4Lin and VMWare are virtual machine software. What this means is they create a miniature computer on your harddrive complete with devices and a miniature virtual harddrive. These products require that you install Microsoft Windows on them just like a real PC in order to run. The upside to these products is that they tend to run the software with reliability because the software is essentially running like it would on a dedicated PC. The downside is that since these programs have to emulate an entire PC using software, the performance of the software you run will be much slower than on a real computer.

    Crossover Office, Cedega, and WINE (all based on the same code, originally) are what I like to call proxies. They do not require you to install MS Windows or even to have a valid MS Windows license. What they do is offer an extra "compatibility layer" that sits between MS Windows software and Linux, translating the instructions given by your programs into something Linux can understand. The upside to these programs is that the performance of the software you run on them is usually on-par or faster than on a stand-alone MS Windows computer because the programs you run are using your hardware directly rather than "virtual" hardware inside a program. The downside to these is that not all MS Windows programs will run well, run with stability or even run at all. Whether or not software will run depends on your hardware configuration, which distribution of Linux you use, and what software you're trying to run in the first place.

    Do they work well? I seems Cedega and Wine are for games while the others are for applications.
    Cedega is designed with games in mind, and Crossover is designed with work apps (MS Office, Photoshop, etc) in mind. WINE is kind of an all-purpose application for anything, with no particular focus at all. Just because one app doesn't focus on a particular type of software doesn't necessarily mean it won't run. For instance, some people have been able to get some MS Windows games running with Crossover Office, and others have successfully run productivity apps like MS Office using Cedega.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    95
    I notice that Wine is free while the others cost money. Is wine good enough to use it versus the programs that cost some money. I have heard that wine is hard to use and does not always work.

  6. #5
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nottingham, England
    Posts
    3,906
    Quote Originally Posted by murph1083
    I notice that Wine is free while the others cost money. Is wine good enough to use it versus the programs that cost some money. I have heard that wine is hard to use and does not always work.
    Whoever told you that wine doesn't always work is... er... right. It can be a bit hit and miss, but it's not particularly hard to use. The good news is that it's free - it should be the second stop for you in trying to get your windows app to work, before you try option 3 - one of the paid-for options such as cedega or crossover or vmware or whatever.

    Your first stop should really be to see if there is an equivalent native program for linux to the one you're trying to use, and try that first. For games, you might find that the game you most want to play has a native linux version downloadable from the game's publisher, these often require the original disk to play but nothing more. For other kinds of software there are plenty of alternatives - a list was published on here not long ago, but I'm not sure where it is now (someone may be able to jump in with a link tho...)
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  7. #6
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    Quote Originally Posted by murph1083
    I notice that Wine is free while the others cost money. Is wine good enough to use it versus the programs that cost some money. I have heard that wine is hard to use and does not always work.
    As far as "quality" of the paid versus free versions of WINE, Cedega, CXOffice, I've not really noticed much. I have licensed copies of Cedega 5 and CrossOver Office (don't remember the version), and as others have said it's hit and miss. Some programs work on some computers, some don't. I had one PC that wouldn't run *anything* in Cedega no matter what I did, but if I took that same version of Cedega and ran it on another computer it was fine.

    Running MS Windows software in Linux is a hack job and a crapshoot. Simply put: Linux was not designed to run MS Windows software. I also recommend looking to see if there is a native Linux program that will do what you want rather than spending the time hacking around with WINE. It's not hard to get installed but it's often quite hard to get it to run things. This is true for both the paid and free versions.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  8. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    95
    so you dont thin the "paid" programs are always better? Which one has worked best for you?

  9. #8
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    9,496
    Quote Originally Posted by murph1083
    so you dont thin the "paid" programs are always better?
    In this case, no I don't. I've had just as many problems and successes with free WINE as I have with Cedega or Crossover Office.

    Which one has worked best for you?
    That depends on what computer I'm using and what program I'm trying to run. For games on my AMD64 system (statistics below in my signature), I can run Morrowind, but not any other games I like to play (including the sequel: Oblivion).

    For my older AthlonXP system, Cedega wouldn't run anything at all, but Crossover Office would run Office XP. I couldn't run any games with Crossover on my AthlonXP system.

    WINE would run StarCraft on both my systems, but not anything more complicated like Morrowind and certainly not Microsoft Office or iTunes. Like I said, it's a gamble.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

  10. #9
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by murph1083
    so you dont thin the "paid" programs are always better? Which one has worked best for you?
    I have read in old book from the 90s and stuff about wine and I think it is the best to use since it must have been devolping and evolving for a while. Free programs can most of the time be more preferable, for example using free open office.org instead of mictrosoft word applications . I myself am trying to learn linux so I do not know the excact specifics since I also use windows for games and programs.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •