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It's a fact, that most of programs are released as rpms, and only few of them are available as debs. As from several Linuxes, Debian suites me the best, I'd ...
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  1. #1
    egy
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    rpms with Debian


    It's a fact, that most of programs are released as rpms, and only few of them are available as debs. As from several Linuxes, Debian suites me the best, I'd like to be able to install rpms on this system. I know, that I can apt-get install rpm, but still - this isn't the most comfortable technique. Can apt work with rpms? Or will compiled apt-rpm work good for me? Unfortunately, I haven't fount apt-rpm in deb package (?)...

  2. #2
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    May I ask the name of the application you are trying to install? There are very few packages that Debian doesn't have but you can always convert a RPM do a DEB by using the program "alient." The default creates packages to a DEB. It can handle other formats as well.
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  3. #3
    egy
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    I'm looking for newer versions of the packages, in general. I did a net install, it worked allright, but still I'm not satisfied with the version of KDE, OpenOffice.org, and several others (mainly the big apps).

    It just came to my mind - maybe I'm asking the wrong question? So, even if so, what should I do, if I don't care about stability of my debian install, and want to get packages from the unstable/testing branches?

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  5. #4
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    Well, you'll need to first make the decision to use either testing or unstable. My experience with unstable have resulted in system failure (twice) and that the packages are update daily. The good thing about it is that security is resolved almost as quickly as the stable branch.

    The testing branch is really testing/unstable since it'll periodically get updates from unstable. Security issues with testing is a bit harder since no one maintains it. However, I am seeing that once it's fixed in unstable, it's usually uploaded to the testing branch. Also, there aren't as many updates in one day with this branch.

    If you want to switch to either of these, just open /etc/apt/sources.list and change all words "stable" to "unstable (or testing)." Also, comment out the security site (if you are using one) since only stable branch has that access.

    Once you are done, you can run 'apt-get update' and then run 'apt-get -u dist-upgrade' to take care of the update. If you are running a desktop, I'd suggest you stop X and the window manger, display manager and etc before doing this is a text console (ctrl-alt-f1 and then kill the appropriate processes).

    Let us know if you need help.
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