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Hello, Can anybody suggest me how to make a Linux machine a member of Windows domain ? I tried a lot by searching in Microsoft publications. Nowhere it is mentioning. ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! bravobritto's Avatar
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    Smile Making linux as member


    Hello,

    Can anybody suggest me how to make a Linux machine a member of Windows domain ? I tried a lot by searching in Microsoft publications. Nowhere it is mentioning. How my login will change afterwards ? Is this possible ?

    Regards
    Britto :o

  2. #2
    Linux User DThor's Avatar
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    If by a windows domain you mean a workgroup, then you should use Samba. Almost all user-friendly recent Linux distros come with Samba installed and auto-configuring by default. How you specifically do it depends on the distro and version you've installed.

    It's not surprising that MS isn't going to publish helpful HOWTO's on how to get Linux to play in their world. There's lots and lots of those out there, though. Google is your friend, to say nothing of your distro docs. I'd pump all this into google and track down some HOWTO's next. It should be pretty straightforward.

    DT

  3. #3
    Just Joined! bravobritto's Avatar
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    Talking NTP client settings

    Thanks for your suggestion. Now here is my problem with Linux NTP client. I've Solaris 8 as my NTP server. When I restart NTP daemon in Linux then only it is syncing with NTP server. Why in other times it is not synchronizing with my local NTP server ?

    Britto

  4. #4
    Linux User DThor's Avatar
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    Sorry, I'm not following. You want it to slave to the Solaris, right? Are you saying it's not?

    Anyway, you'll need to configure the NTP client to look at whatever server you want...it's not like DHCP where it's broadcasting and local computers will automatically detect and talk to it. By default I suspect it's looking at some sort of internet default ntp server.

    Again, depending on your distro, there's different ways to configure this. Most have a GUI to it, but you could always hunt down the config file(likely /etc/ntp.conf), alter it, and restart the service. That's the sort of stuff the GUI approach will handle for you though.

    DT

  5. #5
    Just Joined! bravobritto's Avatar
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    Question

    Here is the ntp.conf file :

    [root@blrecap1C etc]# more ntp.conf

    #

    # Undisciplined Local Clock. This is a fake driver intended for backup

    # and when no outside source of synchronized time is available. The

    # default stratum is usually 3, but in this case we elect to use stratum

    # 0. Since the server line does not have the prefer keyword, this driver

    # is never used for synchronization, unless no other

    # synchronization source is available. In case the local host is

    # controlled by some external source, such as an external oscillator or

    # another protocol, the prefer keyword would cause the local host to

    # disregard all other synchronization sources, unless the kernel

    # modifications are in use and declare an unsynchronized condition.

    #

    server ntpserver1

    server ntpserver2

    server ntpserver3

    peer ntppeerA

    peer ntppeerB



    server 127.127.1.0 # local clock

    fudge 127.127.1.0 stratum 13



    #

    # Drift file. Put this in a directory which the daemon can write to.

    # No symbolic links allowed, either, since the daemon updates the file

    # by creating a temporary in the same directory and then rename()'ing

    # it to the file.

    #

    driftfile /var/lib/ntp/drift

    #multicastclient # listen on default 224.0.1.1

    broadcastdelay 0.008



    #

    # Authentication delay. If you use, or plan to use someday, the

    # authentication facility you should make the programs in the auth_stuff

    # directory and figure out what this number should be on your machine.

    #

    authenticate no



    #

    # Keys file. If you want to diddle your server at run time, make a

    # keys file (mode 600 for sure) and define the key number to be

    # used for making requests.

    #

    # PLEASE DO NOT USE THE DEFAULT VALUES HERE. Pick your own, or remote

    # systems might be able to reset your clock at will. Note also that

    # ntpd is started with a -A flag, disabling authentication, that

    # will have to be removed as well.

    #

    #keys /etc/ntp/keys

    [root@blrecap1C etc]#


    I don't find anything wrong here. I suspect runlevel settings. What else should I do. Shall I write a script and put in crontab so that after every 15 mt.s it will restart my ntpd daemon ?

    Regards
    Britto

  6. #6
    Linux User DThor's Avatar
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    Haven't a clue. You didn't answer my question and tell me what's wrong exactly, or what distro you're using. Starting the ntp client every 15 minutes sounds like a bad idea and certainly wouldn't be the way to solve anything, just band-aiding it.

    DT

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    Just Joined! bravobritto's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    May I know what is this Distro ? Output of what command you need ? Just guide me, if you can. So that you may feel comfortable in troubleshootng this problem. I'm not an expert in Linux. Can you brief me about the functioning of NTP clients ?

    Regards
    Britto

  8. #8
    Linux User DThor's Avatar
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    Sorry. By "distro" I mean which distribution of Linux you're running(for example, SUSE 10.1, Ubuntu, Fedora Core 4, etc.). Each distro has it's own interface, and sometimes a different setup, for common services like NTP.

    This link is a little terse and techie, but has all the details. Essentially there needs to be an NTP server running, that is a trusted clock source, and your computer runs a client that contacts that server(or optionally, multiple servers and averages) and gets the time from it.

    If you want something a little less techie but more detailed than that, I would google.

    I strongly recommend you get a basic HOWTO for the distro you're running and do things that way, rather than manually editing config files. You still haven't indicated how you know there's something wrong or not.

    DT

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    Just Joined! bravobritto's Avatar
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    Smile

    Time usually just advances. This is true. The OS we are having is a recompiled version of some Linux flavor. We are into Telecom sector. My friend suggested to check the run-level. In Solaris we uses who -r to check that. How to check it here ?

    Regards
    Britto :o

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