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I have kde installed, I click on console login. That takes me to a login black screen. I login, type dmesg. There is no scroll bar, how do I view ...
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  1. #1
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    How do you scroll or see individual pages with console


    I have kde installed, I click on console login. That takes me to a login black screen. I login, type dmesg. There is no scroll bar, how do I view the rest of the info. Cat command? or other? Frank

    I want to have info from dmesg to paste on a forum, If needed. Frank

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie theNbomr's Avatar
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    Not too sure exactly what you are looking at, but try shift-PgUp & shift-PgDn. Alternatively, try using Konsole, which is a full-featured text terminal.
    --- rod.
    Stuff happens. Then stays happened.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    Pipe it to less or more.
    Code:
    dmesg | less

  4. #4
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    Frank, try this to create a text file output of dmesg.
    Code:
    dmesg > dmesg.txt
    or

    dmesg | more
    Then hit "return" to scroll down. When you see what you want hit "q" to quit.

    Thanks, lindylex

  5. #5
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    right idea, but

    Quote Originally Posted by reed9 View Post
    Pipe it to less or more.
    Code:
    dmesg | less
    If you need to have it available at any time, append it to a text file:
    Code:
    dmesg > text.file
    You can edit the file to prettify it.

    If you're working in some Desktop environment, the x-terminal window may allow copying directly if you select it with a mouse, then travel to the menu bar or right click to copy. Your favorite IRC program should allow a right-click paste, or CTRL+V

    If you're only working in a CLI environment you should have gpm running (or in a Desktop Environment with an X-terminal console without gpm) it allows mouse options at the command line. Follow me on this:
    left click to select and copy individual items (click and drag)
    right click to select and copy a block of text (click at beginning and click at end)
    middle click to paste Where Your Blinking Cursor Sits Right Now (both mouse buttons clicked together if you do not have a three-button mouse or a wheel)


    Just preachin' to teh choir...

  6. #6
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    Thanks Reed, Lindylex, Thenbour and Dolo. These are cool tools, I tried all. I still can't make use dmesg > dmesg.txt. I input it, without any error messages. I been web searching, learned a few more new things, but not how to do the next step in, dmesg > dmesg.txt. I will keep searching, while waiting for a reply.

    I feel comfortable with debian, am new to linux, and a novice at basic linux commands. Thanks again for the help. Frank

  7. #7
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    missing pieces...

    I would *HIGHLY* suggest against doing any sort of command line stuff, especially on an actual console, without having a good understanding of it: use a graphical login like KDE (or Gnome) and use a console program there like Konsole.

    If you're not familiar with the command line in Linux, don't bother shoving the output into a file: that will require that you are familiar with some of the text editors like vi, vim, emacs, or nano (most of which are not exactly user-friendly in a pinch). Pipe the output to "less" or "more".

    When the others and myself are referring to a "pipe", which looks a lot like a lowercase L, is in fact a special character. On most keyboards, it is on the backslash key, and looks like a vertical line that is split in the middle.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by slaughter View Post
    I would *HIGHLY* suggest against doing any sort of command line stuff, especially on an actual console, without having a good understanding of it: use a graphical login like KDE (or Gnome) and use a console program there like Konsole.

    If you're not familiar with the command line in Linux, don't bother shoving the output into a file: that will require that you are familiar with some of the text editors like vi, vim, emacs, or nano (most of which are not exactly user-friendly in a pinch). Pipe the output to "less" or "more".

    When the others and myself are referring to a "pipe", which looks a lot like a lowercase L, is in fact a special character. On most keyboards, it is on the backslash key, and looks like a vertical line that is split in the middle.
    I actually feel very confortable using Nano. I would not try Vi just yet. I don't even know what the advantages are to Vi over Nano. Where I am the weakest of all is the command line. I have been winging it, with Debian, Vector Linux, and tried Gentoo for about a month.. I've used the pipe symbol before, its right above the backward slash symbol on my keyboard. But I reiterate, I am truly a novice at the command line. If my gui or kde goes out, I would like to be able to correct the problem from the command line. I did have to use the Console to get Kde going. In this case the egg came before the chicken...(Kde) All the other, distros handed me the chicken on a platter, and added lemon Mergangue pie for dessert.

  9. #9
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by frank56 View Post
    If my gui or kde goes out, I would like to be able to correct the problem from the command line. I did have to use the Console to get Kde going.
    If you should decide to learn the Linux command line, you can check here for some quick and easy lessons:

    LinuxCommand.org: Learn the Linux command line. Write shell scripts.
    oz

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar View Post
    If you should decide to learn the Linux command line, you can check here for some quick and easy lessons:

    LinuxCommand.org: Learn the Linux command line. Write shell scripts.
    Quick and easy lessons. I sure can use that. Thanks Ozar. I am clicking on your link..right now.

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