Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Ok... well as soon as I saw Arch Linux, that was it - I had dumped Ms. Windows for Ubuntu, and now I dumped Ubuntu for Arch Linux. I didn't ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined! spacetekcrusaders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Querta
    Posts
    25

    Relationship Woes


    Ok... well as soon as I saw Arch Linux, that was it - I had dumped Ms. Windows for Ubuntu, and now I dumped Ubuntu for Arch Linux. I didn't want to be alone during the transition from Ubuntu to Mrs. Arch so I dated her sister, Archbang during the transition. I am having relationship problems though.

    I only dated Archbang for a week before I got a date with Arch Linux, and during that time I never met their brother. At first my date with Arch Linux went great - installation and configuration went smoothly. Until I met her brother, or more like I was supposed to meet her brother, but he never showed up.

    I don't know if Mr. Pacman was jealous or what, but he did not seem to like me at all. When installing Arch Linux, I had to pick a Local Host. The wiki said that just meant to name your computer, so I named it zachary. I also put zachary into the other place it goes later on, I forget what it was called but something like etc/config. or something (it was the place where the wiki said I would need to put the Local Host again). Later on, when I tried to check that I configured the computer correctly, it refused to ping to google. So, like the instructions said, I went back to check my config to make sure I did it right. I am not sure about everything, but I did not see anything that looked wrong. I tried again - still failed. Then I tried pinging to zachary. Well, after that, the computer began downloading something 64 kb at a time. I let it go on for about 250 lines, but I did not see anything in the instructions that said I should let it do this so I aborted the action. Every time I tried to use pacman I got an error message. Do I need to be connected online to do this? I was using an installation cd that I got from eBay to install Archlinux. I do not know if the computer was connected to the internet (wireless) during this time.
    I did not get a command terminal (like I thought I saw on youtube). Instead it was just a black screen with white type. I tried for about 2 hours with no luck. No matter what I tried, it seemed to fail to download the packages - and I was unable to get xorg to get a GUI. So I said bye to Arch Linux.

    I reinstalled ArchBang without any glitches. It has a GUI that I can use easily, but I am having problems with ArchBang too. For one, I havent been able to get pacman to work on that either! Another problem I have with ArchBang, is that when I put a Cd in the computer, I can not find the cd anywhere on Archbang! There does not seem to be any "My Computer" and the CD does not appear on the desktop. I searched all the files to no avail. Then I manually went through the files - still no luck. I tried rebooting the computer - nope. I should probably mention that this was not the Arch Linux installation cd. It was actually a tutorial CD that came with the Arch Linux CD that I hoped could help me with pacman.

    One last thing, if you are still reading my jibberish, is it really even worth it for me to install Arch Linux i.e. is it in any way really better than ArchBang. I know Arch Linux is more configurable than ArchBang and I have heard Archbang referred to as a "bloated Arch Linux", but is there any way that Arch Linux is actually really superior to ArchBang. That is a vague question, and I know there is no real answer whether one distro is better than another (matter of need/preference) so let me rephrase the question: What can you do with Arch Linux that you can't do with Archbang, and why do people choose Arch Linux rather than ArchBang?

    Right now I have a cd with arch linux on it and a usb with archbang on it so I can use either one. However, if Arch Linux is not really any better than ArchBang, then there is no sense in going through the trouble of trying to install Arch Linux again. Regardless, I still need to figure out how to use pacman.

    Thanks in advance for any help. I know there is a lot here, and I may have been ambiguous in places so let me know if you need clarification of anything. Thanks again.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    4,651
    Your hostname can be zachary, that's fine. You would put this in /etc/rc.conf under HOSTNAME

    Code:
    HOSTNAME="zachary"
    And in the file /etc/hosts

    Code:
    #<ip-address>   <hostname.domain.org>   <hostname>
    127.0.0.1       localhost.localdomain   localhost zachary
    Pacman does need an internet connection to download from the web, yes. You can install local packages using the -U flag
    Code:
    su -
    pacman -U /path/to/local/package.tar.xz
    Pacman is configured in /etc/pacman.conf

    Generally, you'll point to a mirror list file for specific download mirrors, ie

    Code:
    [core]
    Include = /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist
    
    [extra]
    Include = /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist
    The mirrorlist file will have entries as so

    Code:
    Server = ftp://mirror.aarnet.edu.au/pub/archlinux/$repo/os/$arch
    (If you're getting an error with the $arch variable, you need to define Architecture in /etc/pacman.conf)

    Code:
    Architecture = x86_64
    Or i686 for 32 bit.

    There is info on the Mirrors Wiki for how to find the fastest, most current mirrors for use.

    You do not need the internet to install Arch if you're using the core installation CD. If you're using the net install image, you do need internet. Of course, after install, you'll have a hard time installing a GUI and other software without an internet connection.

    I haven't used ArchBang, but my understanding is that it's just Arch with a pre-configured openbox installation. I doubt it's intrinsically better or worse than straight Arch, other than many Archer's are purists and disdain allowing someone else to configure your system for you. (Doing so is somewhat against the whole purpose and DIY philosophy of Arch.) But that's totally a personal decision and if you're happy with having it all ready out of the box, go for it.

    The CD mounting issue depends on a couple of things that I don't know about ArchBang. Which file manager does it use, for one? I would guess it's using pcmanfm or thunar, both of which should have an icon appear in the file manager when you insert any sort of removable media, cd, flash drive, etc. Is that not happening?

  3. #3
    Just Joined! spacetekcrusaders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Querta
    Posts
    25
    If I remember correctly, I think those are the codes I used. I am pretty sure that my probably has been that I have not been connected to the internet. How do you connect when there is nothing but a black screen in front of you? Is that what the "pinging" is? Then I guess you can test to make sure you are connected by the ping google test? (BTW I am using wireless for this).

    I think Archbang is using thunar, but I can't remember for sure - I will have to check when I get home. I think I saw thunar, but did not know it was the file manager. I was looking through the home directory when I was looking cd, I guess I will try thunar tonight.

    I know Arch has the DIY philosophy, and I saw the DIY part when I had to go through all the "lines" when I was installing the software. I guess I will have to do more research before I decide. If Arch Linux is fater, more powerful, or more manageable than ArchBang, then I will probably go ahead and install it. However, like I said, if it ends up that Arch Linux ends up being pretty much the same as ArchBang, then I probably won't switch.

    By the way, thank you in particular, reed9, for your detailed and clear answers. I know it is not neccessarily easy to write such easy to understand explanations and I really appreciate it. =)

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    4,651
    Pinging is just an way to see if you're getting through to another machine. If there is no connection to the other machine, the ping will fail

    Code:
    [reed@Arch-Desktop ~]$ ping -c4 moose.com
    PING moose.com (208.87.33.150) 56(84) bytes of data.
    64 bytes from 208.87.33.150: icmp_req=1 ttl=46 time=70.9 ms
    64 bytes from 208.87.33.150: icmp_req=2 ttl=46 time=71.5 ms
    64 bytes from 208.87.33.150: icmp_req=3 ttl=46 time=68.5 ms
    64 bytes from 208.87.33.150: icmp_req=4 ttl=46 time=68.3 ms
    
    --- moose.com ping statistics ---
    4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3003ms
    Here we have success, 0% packet loss. A complete failure would show 100% packet loss. Sometimes you can ping by ip, but not by their human readable name, which can pinpoint an error in DNS resolution for example.

    In other words, an IP address for google.com is 74.125.226.176. If you were able to ping that address
    Code:
    ping -c4 74.125.226.176
    But didn't get through using google.com
    Code:
    ping -c4 google.com
    You would have a good idea that the process which translates google.com into 74.125.226.176, ie, DNS resolution, is where the failure is at.

    There are quite a few options to get your internet connection going from the command line. If your wireless connection is not encrypted or encrypted using WEP, it can be as simple as doing
    Code:
    su -
    iwconfig wlan0 essid "MyNetwork" key s:passphrase
    dhcpcd wlan0
    With WPA encryption, things get a little more complicated and you need to use wpa_supplicant.

    All of this assumes you have the appropriate drivers and firmware for your wireless card already. Drivers will mostly be included out of the box, but firmware often requires an extra download. (You'll also needed to have installed the wireless_tools package during installation.)

    The Wireless Wiki is pretty thorough on all that, but post if you need help there. In that case, we'll want the output of
    Code:
    lspci -vnn | grep -a4 -i net
    lsmod
    It sounds to me like sticking with ArchBang would be fine for you. Again, it is Arch Linux with some extra stuff installed and pre-configured for you. Anything you can do in Arch, you can do in ArchBang. The benefit in doing a plain Arch install would primarily be as a learning exercise, getting a better handle of what goes on under the hood.

    Also, it looks like ArchBang has wicd installed for network management. You can use that from the console with the command
    Code:
    wicd-curses

  6. #5
    Just Joined! spacetekcrusaders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Querta
    Posts
    25
    Thanks - will let you know what happens.

  7. #6
    Just Joined! spacetekcrusaders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Querta
    Posts
    25
    Thanks - I think everything worked out ok. I think I have decided to stick with ArchBang, I figured out that you need to use "Disk Utility" to access CDs and USBs, and I was able to use pacman on ArchBang. Thanks!

    =)

  8. #7
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    4,651
    Glad that's all worked out. I found on their release page, if you do want the file manager (not sure what "disk utility" is) to show removeable media, you need to install gvfs and make a small change to .xinitrc.

    -Once you have installed ArchBang, if you want Thunar to detect all your partitions, install gvfs by typing in the terminal “packer -S gvfs” (thanks narical) and change the following line in ~/.xinitrc from:
    “exec ck-launch-session openbox-session” to
    “exec dbus-launch ck-launch-session openbox-session”

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •