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I've never used Arch but know a little about Grub. So your partitions are the same as they were previously with a small boot partition on sda3 and your system ...
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  1. #11
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    I've never used Arch but know a little about Grub. So your partitions are the same as they were previously with a small boot partition on sda3 and your system files on sda4. If that is the case you need to create a mount point for sda3, mount it and then go to the boot and grub directories to see if the necessary files are there.

    Boot the Live CD, open a terminal, log in as root and open a terminal or konsole and type:

    mkdir /mnt/sda3
    You need to mount, usually the filesystem type is necessary. I'm guessing it is ext4. If not change the command below.

    mount -t ext4 /dev/sda3 /mnt/sda3
    The above should mount the partition. In the terminal you will then need to check to see if necessary files are present.

    ls -l /mnt/sda3/
    ls -l /mnt/sda3/boot/
    If all the files needed seem to be there, post the contents of the menu.lst file (you can skip windows entries).

    If you don't know what to do at this point, run the fdisk command and post that also.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    I've never used Arch but know a little about Grub. So your partitions are the same as they were previously with a small boot partition on sda3 and your system files on sda4. If that is the case you need to create a mount point for sda3, mount it and then go to the boot and grub directories to see if the necessary files are there.

    Boot the Live CD, open a terminal, log in as root and open a terminal or konsole and type:



    You need to mount, usually the filesystem type is necessary. I'm guessing it is ext4. If not change the command below.



    The above should mount the partition. In the terminal you will then need to check to see if necessary files are present.





    If all the files needed seem to be there, post the contents of the menu.lst file (you can skip windows entries).

    If you don't know what to do at this point, run the fdisk command and post that also.
    Thank you so much! I follow your steps, and it turned out to be the recently changed file-names after all which is weird because it installed fine a few weeks ago. All is working now, and my next step is going to be getting a desktop environment running! You will probably hear from me again!

  3. #13
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaytounit View Post
    it turned out to be the recently changed file-names after all which is weird because it installed fine a few weeks ago.
    The new kernel just came out, so the filename changes just occurred in the last few weeks. You can check this thread for the exact date and more details on it:

    Arch Linux - News: Changes to kernel package and filenames

    If you used an older installer CD to install Arch, then upgrade the kernel, you have to make the name changes to the menu.lst file or your system won't boot properly.

    Glad you are up and running.
    oz

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  5. #14
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    The symlinks should allow you to boot the system, it's recommended you update bootloader to point to the new kernel and initrd - check the system boots then remove the symlinks.

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