Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19
Like Tree2Likes
There is nothing to stop you installing Unity on Manjaro although the general consensus on the forums there is don't as it installs too much Ubuntu cruft. If you want ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #11
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,503

    There is nothing to stop you installing Unity on Manjaro although the general consensus on the forums there is don't as it installs too much Ubuntu cruft.

    If you want the eye candy out of the box then the KDE or Cinnamon editions are going to be your best bet, however, Xfce can be made to look pretty much how you want it but you have to work at it. My favourite Xfce plugin which has an Arch repository and there is even a way to give it a global menu if that's your thing.

    [edit]Apparently Manjaro Xfce uses the Whisker menu by default. Nice.[/edit]
    Last edited by elija; 07-22-2013 at 08:11 AM.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  2. #12
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    9
    I moved from Windows to Ubuntu and found the GUI quite easy to use. I have started migrating to Arch because I want a totally cli interface. I used Ubuntu to get the very basics of Linux but have found that each distro does things a bit differently. I support Red Hat at my job so going between yum, apt-get and pacman can take a little to get used to.

    But I encourage you to simply try Arch, Ubuntu, Fedora and any other distro out that there sparks your interest. Use these forums to ask questions if you get stuck along the way. I personally prefer Arch so that I can understand what is going on with the system. I would like to learn C so I can actually tweak the source code but have settled for Bash since that is more suited to a sysadmin, as I am.

    Don't worry about which disk to use for an install. Just pick one and experiment. And have fun, too.

  3. #13
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    42
    You could also try xfce, KDE, or any of the other desktop environments as well. Arch is what you make of it, and if you want it to be more like Ubuntu there's nothing at all stopping you.

  4. #14
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Crossville, TN. USA
    Posts
    805
    I've tried just about every desktop environment that's offered and really didn't care for any of em' except for MATE. One thing that's keeping me from even thinking about giving Arch a try is that it's gone totally 64 bit and my laptops are only 32 bit machines so no Arch for me, not on these laptops.
    So far Point Linux with MATE has been very light on the resources. It only takes around 165MB to run the desktop, which isn't bad IMHO.

  5. #15
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,042
    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    One thing that's keeping me from even thinking about giving Arch a try is that it's gone totally 64 bit and my laptops are only 32 bit machines so no Arch for me, not on these laptops.
    Where have you got the impression Arch is going 64 bit only? from FAQ reasons for not using Arch include ...
    you require support for an architecture other than x86_64, i686 or ARM.
    ... which suggests 32 bit support.
    drl likes this.

  6. #16
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Crossville, TN. USA
    Posts
    805
    Just downloaded the latest Distro of Arch and it wouldn't boot to the Live USB. Besides, I'm perfectly happy with Point Linux, no real need to move to Arch or other non-Debian based OS since Debian is what I'm use to and what I enjoy.

  7. #17
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,042
    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    Just downloaded the latest Distro of Arch and it wouldn't boot to the Live USB.
    from beginners guide ... Note that the single ISO image supports both 32 and 64-bit architectures.
    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    Besides, I'm perfectly happy with Point Linux, no real need to move to Arch or other non-Debian based OS since Debian is what I'm use to and what I enjoy.
    that's fine, my last post was only to make sure I had not missed some information somewhere indicating Arch was going 64 bit only,

  8. #18
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    10
    thank you for all

  9. #19
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Harrow, UK
    Posts
    1,206
    Arch is bleeding edge, so you must be prepared for things to break sometimes. It's a rolling release, which saves you from having to do major upgrades, but "rolling release" sometimes interacts with "bleeding edge" in unexpected ways.

    It's considered an expert's system, so it's excellent for further learning. It's minimalist - no bloat. It doesn't come with a default desktop so you can install the one you want.

    It has a very strong community, so you have to be prepared to do things "the Arch way". I couldn't warm to it, but perhaps that's just me!
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •