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I was a iMac OS X user for 11 years after having a terrible experience with Windows '98. After my Mac dies(EMP from near by lightning strike) I'd found that ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Everyone seems to be talking about Arch.


    I was a iMac OS X user for 11 years after having a terrible experience with Windows '98. After my Mac dies(EMP from near by lightning strike) I'd found that I'd gotten lazy tech wise because I never had to do much to keep my OS X running.
    Couldn't afford another Apple machine, didn't want Windows so I picked up an older used laptop and put Ubuntu 12.04LTS on it because it looked a lot like the OS X that I was use to. It's been a pretty decent install, does what I want with Linux BUT everyone seems to be talking about Arch lately. A local guy at a computer repair shop is running it on his Mac laptop, the guys on The Linux Action Show on Jupiter Broadcasting have switched to it and it just seems like it'd be something that I could use to learn more about Linux with.
    So, since I have a 250GB hard drive on my newer of my two laptops I was thinking about cutting off a 100GB partition and installing Arch along side my Ubuntu.
    I'd be making a "Live" USB key of Arch and installing from that. Is it a pretty straight forward install? Do I just pick "Install alongside Ubuntu 12.04" and let it do it's thing from there?
    What about "building" my Arch op system, I know there's repos to get software from(not like the .ppa's in Ubuntu) but how hard is it really to get things set up so it'll run smoothly? Also, I guess I'm one of the few that actually likes the Unity desktop environment, can I run that with Arch or will I have to go KDE or Xfec or something other then Unity?
    Anyway, I'll wait for some responses before I do any installs. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    An Arch install is a lot more involved than an Ubuntu one. However Manjaro is a nicely set up introduction to Arch. Manjaro is Xfce by default but as Unity is available in the Arch repos then there is no reason not to install it..
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



    The Fifth Continent

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    I figure if I'm going to go Arch then I'm going ARCH so I'll be forced to learn the "ins" and "outs" of it all. I'm getting a bit more use to Terminal and can do some of the basic "sudo apt-get" deals and can check acpi and ls stuff in Terminal. I don't know if I should just do a partition install on my Dell or install to an external hard drive and boot to it. What do ya'll think, bite the ol' bullet and dual boot with Arch/Ubuntu or install Arch on the external hard drive?

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    With Arch you install the base system, then install any additional things you want to afterwards ... including a GUI - look at the beginners guide X is a post install activity.
    Arch is a rolling release, Ubuntu is not - there are pros and cons to fixed release and rolling release approaches.
    Whether you decide to install to an internal or external hard drive is up to you, but make sure when you install the bootloader you do it to the correct place - if you decide to install to an external hard drive then make sure you don't install the bootloader to the internal hard drive MBR or you will need the external hard drive to be connected to boot the system

  6. #5
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Just how "base" is the Base System?

  7. #6
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    It's a few years since I had to do a fresh install (rolling release) ... you get a root login, the package manager pacman which will let you install packages you want and not much more (working from memory). Don't expect a GUI, you have to install that if you want it (which you may or may not want) easy to do using pacman ... but it's one of several tasks for you. Don't exepct any GUI tools to hold your hand, that's not the Arch way

    If your willing to give things a try, and want control over your system rather than having things working automagically then give it a go ... if you want everything driven from a GUI then it's not going to match your requirements.

    Distros like Arch, Gentoo, Crux etc force you to learn some things about your system setup, Ubuntu and Mint allow you to use the system and learn things when you want to ... you don't need to switch from Ubutnu to learn about the cli

  8. #7
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    Once you install Arch and get it to boot to the root login, most of your work is done. Next you just have to install your graphics driver and a desktop environment with a couple of simple commands.
    After that you just install stuff as you need it.

  9. #8
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    One thing that I loved about OS X and now about Ubuntu 12.04LTS is that they have a nice GUI. Straight forward, intuitive, click on what you want and you get it. Sounds like Arch may be more of a Power User thing. All I do with my computer is surf the Interweb, watch a few vids on VLC or listen to music on Clementine. I have my UNetbootin for making Live USB's and ClamTK to scan for viruses. I've yet to learn GIMP but I've got it installed, most photo editing is done through Shotwell photo viewer. Just really basic stuff. I think I might just try to install it to the external hard drive so I can mess with it a bit to see if it'll be for me or not before I actually use up internal hard drive space. Thanks for all the info guys.

    Ok, just tried to boot to the Live USB of Arch and it was an epic fail. Downloading Manjaro to give it a try instead. Looks like it'll be a bit easier to transition into then totally building up my entire system from scratch. Getting the Lxde Desktop since it seems to be a bit lighter then KDE, Cinnamon or Mate. Wish me luck.
    Last edited by TNFrank; 07-22-2013 at 02:11 AM.

  10. #9
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    "Build a Killer Customized Arch Linux Installation (and Learn All About Linux in the Process)

    As Arch is definitely not for Linux beginners, you may be wondering what its advantages are. While it's pretty popular among developers and the like, it's also pretty popular among general tweakers and geeks that like to really get at the nuts and bolts of a system."

    Build a Killer Customized Arch Linux Installation (and Learn All About Linux in the Process)

    Forget all about apt-get. What you do in Ubuntu forget about as far as package management commands in Arch.
    Ozar, a loooooooong time member here and former moderator is a Die hard Arch linux user like Hazel is a die hard
    Crux linux user as I am a die hard AntiX user.

    Arch is cutting edge software, rolling release, and if you get a handle on it and are able to maneuver comfortably
    in it. You will be talking about Arch and probably giving up a Ubuntu as all of the above members systems I mentioned
    run faster and use less ram than Ubuntu with their custom tweaked setups. Dapper Dan has or had one of the fastest
    Crux Icewm EEEPC netbooks out there.

    If serious in taking this trip. This and this is your friend.

    I borrow both when tweaking my AntiX installs. As well as the Gentoo wiki also.
    workdowg likes this.

  11. #10
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Just too Manjaro LDXE for a quick little test drive via Live USB, looks like Windows '95 or Mac OS9 IMHO. Not really what I'm looking for. I just like the Human look and feel of Ubuntu 12.04LTS too much I guess. There's no hope for me, LOL.

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