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Between packages that I want not being in Debian Stable and having to move to Debian Testing to get them and then Debian Testing not working with Gdebi and other ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Antergos good Distro to learn Arch?


    Between packages that I want not being in Debian Stable and having to move to Debian Testing to get them and then Debian Testing not working with Gdebi and other little "issues" I'm just about ready to give Arch a try. I wonder if Antergos would be a good Distro to use to learn Arch and all the pacman stuff? That way I could get my feet wet but have a Distro with some "stuff" already installed then after I'm use to running it I can move to a "Real" Arch install and build up what I want. Anyway, just wanted to see if anyone else started out with Arch that way. Thanks.

    P.S.
    Tried to boot to the Antergos CD, nothing, so I'm just going to download Arch and burn it to a CD and see what I get.
    Last edited by TNFrank; 04-16-2014 at 05:44 PM.
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  2. #2
    Just Joined! pribon's Avatar
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    I installed Antergos and it lasted 4.5 hours.

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    No Antergos is terrible, if you want a simple arch go Manjaro.
    Though personally I really hate arch for needing to compile every 10 seconds when an update comes for a package in the AUR and then having the system break leaving you an empty shell for wasting so much time compiling a package.
    Arch really is the distro for sado massochists.

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  5. #4
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    I have gone with Manjaro. Installed easily and with an Xfce DE it's easy to set up the way I want it and still light weight. From what I understand Manjaro is to Arch as Ubuntu is to Debian. It's an off shoot of Arch with it's own Repos and stuff so you use pacman like in Arch but it's easier to mess around with AND you can still use the AUR to get packages as well as the Manjaro Repos.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

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    Why is Antergos terrible ?

    Quote Originally Posted by MadmanRB View Post
    No Antergos is terrible, if you want a simple arch go Manjaro.
    Though personally I really hate arch for needing to compile every 10 seconds when an update comes for a package in the AUR and then having the system break leaving you an empty shell for wasting so much time compiling a package.
    Arch really is the distro for sado massochists.
    I installed Antergos / Cinnamon and it seems (less than 1 hour) good.
    What was it that I should find terrible?

    I am not disagreeing with you, but I installed it in a vm to see if I would want to move one of my physical machines over.
    I would like to find out all the bad things before I waste time installing on a physical machine.

    If you could either give me your reasons for disliking it, or point me to a post with more details, I would be appreciative.

  7. #6
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Ok, finally downloaded the "Testing" version of Antergos and actually got it install pretty easily. Love being able to pick my Desktop on install. Only little hitch thus far is getting the Bluetooth working. I'm sure I'll figure it out sooner or later if no one can chime in and give me an easy fix to get it working. Anyway, Antergos is going onto all of my laptops soon as I get the Bluetooth issue worked out on my #2 testing laptop.

    P.S.
    One other "little" thing, I ran the CPUBlowfish benchmark with the new Antergos install and it's a full .15 faster then with any other Distro that I've run. It clocked in at 9.08, most Distros will run 9.20-9.30 so there's something about Antergos/Arch that's making the CPU cores run faster and more efficently.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  8. #7
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Ok, starting to have second thoughts about Antergos on my NC4400. Wifi won't work, tried everything I can find on the interweb but just no deal. Fan runs a lot more then it did with Manjaro. Not sure why the wifi works on my NC6400 but not the 4400, same Intel Pro/Wireless wifi card, go figure.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  9. #8
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Update. Ok, figure this one out. Same DVD I burned to try and do my Antergos installs a while back but this time I actually have both bluetooth and wifi on all my laptops. Went a head and did the installs with GNOME so now I'm running all Antergos on my laptops. I'd love to know what changed since my first go with trying to do the installs when bluetooth wouldn't work and wifi and bluetooth wouldn't work on the NC4400 but I guess I just shouldn't question it too much or I'll jinks it. LOL.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  10. #9
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    Antergos is a good distro in order to use Arch without learning it.

    Currently I am using Antergos as the only OS on all my computers. So far I had to use four terminal commands and those commands are not Arch-specific:

    Code:
    cd
    make help
    make build ARCH=x86-64-modern
    sudo pluma
    So far I compiled only one program with make, the others I got from the Arch User Repository.

    The motivation in order to migrate fully to Antergos emerged from serious performance problems with Linux Mint Debian (LMDE) after watching Videos with Firefox. The only workaround was a reboot, but that was unsatisfying. I did not find any help in forums. On top of that the problem also occured reproducably under my second OS Lubuntu 14.04. Under Antergos everything is fine. Maybe the newer kernel supports my hardware better.

    There is some room for improvement. On my laptop the installation went smoothly within 1 hour. On my desktop I had a dualboot with LMDE and Lubuntu, therefore I wanted to partition from scratch. I was not able to partition my harddisk with the Antergos Live-USB. Thus I used a Debian Live-USB in order to format and partition the harddisk. After that I installed Antergos. No big deal, but it can be a dealbreaker for a Linux beginner.

    It's a Rolling Release, and it really rolls. It involves daily updates. As far as I understand, all Arch updates are passed on the spot. Of course you can install them, whenever you want to. There are no annoying pop-up windows. Installing programs is not difficult, but it takes some time, because the user is asked several times, if (s)he wants to change the configuration (which I never did so far). That is the Arch way.

  11. #10
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    I noticed that I have had updates daily but never get a notification like I did in Manjaro when they were available so I just do the sudo pacman -Syyu every morning at first boot and I'm good to go from there.
    As long as things don't break I'll be fine but if something does break then that may be a deal breaker for me. I run Linux so I can use my laptops, not so I can spend time sorting out problems with the Op System.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

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