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I was reading through the Arch Wiki and it looks like I need to set up the mirrors that will be used when I do a pacman -S for installing ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Arch mirrors?


    I was reading through the Arch Wiki and it looks like I need to set up the mirrors that will be used when I do a pacman -S for installing stuff through Terminal. Couldn't really make heads or tails of the Wiki though as to what I need to do if anything.
    Do I need to do anything or are mirrors that I need already set up or what? I know in Debian you get a "sources.list" that's pre-setup with the mirrors that the Distro will use. Is Arch(Manjaro) the same or do I need to go in and set them up somehow?
    Part of the reason why I ask is because I can go into pacman package manager and check the AUR box and look for stuff and find it but in Terminal if I do a pacman -S "package" it may or may not show up so is there something that needs to be done so that the AUR and pacman -S can find the same things?
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    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    So Manjaro is using "Stable" Arch Repos to draw packages from in Terminal? In Package Manager when I check the "AUR" box am I drawing on all the Arch Repos then and that's why I can find more 'stuff' then I can in Terminal?
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    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    So Manjaro is using "Stable" Arch Repos to draw packages from in Terminal? In Package Manager when I check the "AUR" box am I drawing on all the Arch Repos then and that's why I can find more 'stuff' then I can in Terminal?
    Beats the hell out of me. You are the one running Manjero. Not me.
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    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    "Stable, is what our normal Manjaro-Users have running. You get our stable repos by installing Manjaro with our official release.
    Latest stable install-media is 0.8.2. So in the end Manjaro-Stable lacks on freshness about 3-4 weeks from Archlinux."

    This is what makes me think that out of the box Manjaro using Arch Stable Repos. I thought ALL Arch, even a Distro using Arch as a base was suppose to be "bleeding edge" stuff? Seems like they have the same deal as Debian with their "Stable", "Testing" and "Unstable" Repos.
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    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Arch is a rolling release. This doesn't necessarily mean that it is bleeding edge but it may be. In the case of Arch, I don't know whether it's bleeding edge or just nearly bleeding edge but in either case, you never need to re-install. It will be kept it as it will be kept pretty much up to date. The same would go for derivatives such as Manjaro.

    I suspect that most distributions will have stable, testing and possibly development repositories after all most users will want well tested software. The testing and development repositories are there for those brave souls that want to do some testing.

    This is a fairly interesting read.
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    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    I saw the link you posted when I was surfing around on the ArchWiki and it was a pretty good read. From what I've found out on the Manjaro forums Manjaro is to Arch as Ubuntu is to Debian. That is to say, Ubuntu is a fork of Debian and Manjaro is a fork of Arch. If I want a "Pure" Arch experience but don't want the trouble of having to set up an Arch install I can go with ArchBang and end up with a Pure Arch install with less fuss. I'm going to go check out an .iso of ArchBang that I just burned to CD to see what it's all about. May throw it on my #2 to play around with.
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    I think installing vanilla arch is not that hard, but check out Bridge Linux it's pretty easy to set up.
    ridobe likes this.

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    When you use pacman -S it doesn't look in the aur. If you want to see the aur packages in the terminal use yaourt.

  10. #10
    Just Joined! ridobe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by electroman6913 View Post
    When you use pacman -S it doesn't look in the aur. If you want to see the aur packages in the terminal use yaourt.
    I've just started using pacaur - does both.

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