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Basically it's a bit more of a "pure" Arch install then Manjaro and you get a choice of 4 different DE's. I've checked out the Xfce(of course, LOL) and the ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Found another "easy" version of Arch, Bridge Linux.


    Basically it's a bit more of a "pure" Arch install then Manjaro and you get a choice of 4 different DE's. I've checked out the Xfce(of course, LOL) and the GNOME and both look pretty good.
    Where Manjaro uses it's own Repos, Bridge uses the Arch Repos so it's not forked like Manjaro is. Also, looks easy enough to install as well so it'd get you up and running faster then trying to do Arch from scratch. Oh well, here's a link to the download site. Enjoy.
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    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    But still not easy to install. The part where you partition your hard drive to set it up for the install is just about as impossible for me to figure out as the one that a Pure Arch install uses. I'm stickin' with Manjaro. Even if it doesn't set things up perfectly as far as partitions go I can always boot back in with a Live USB of Point Linux or the like and use Gparted to tweak the partitions to my liking. Anyway, just thought I'd share this incase ya'll might have thought this was going to be as easy to install as Manjaro, it's not.
    "Now, what y'all wanna do?
    Wanna be hackers? Code crackers? Slackers
    Wastin' time with all the chatroom yakkers?
    9 to 5, chillin' at Hewlett Packard?"

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    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    That's not to bad. At least it's cfdisk rather than fdisk which is very tricky!
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    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    I still don't have a foggy clue as to how to use it, LOL. I just now have gotten use to Gparted and can do stuff with it and now they throw something else at me, guess I'm just going to stick wth Manjaro(and Xfce at that, KDE won't let me connect to my hidden network and MATE didn't work well either) but ya' know what. I like Xfce and any Distro that's based on Arch is fine IMHO. Way more software for the using then the Debian Distros I was using.
    "Now, what y'all wanna do?
    Wanna be hackers? Code crackers? Slackers
    Wastin' time with all the chatroom yakkers?
    9 to 5, chillin' at Hewlett Packard?"

  5. #5
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Code:
    man cfdisk
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  6. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    cfdisk isn't particularly different to gparted. I can see your look of utter disbelief from here

    cfdisk.jpg gparted.jpg

    The left and right keys select menu options and the up and down keys select the partition or space. When you choose new within some free space, you will allocate some space, a type of partition and then select a file system type which, for Linux, is usually 83 (Linux) or 82 (Linux Swap) and when you are happy with it choose the write option to create the partition table.

    The only real differences are:

    • cfdisk is entirely keyboard driven
    • cfdisk is prettier than gparted. Oh wait... the opposite of that.
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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  7. #7
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Tried a few times to set up partitions and install Bridge and each time it was an epic fail. So far Manjaro is the only Arch based Distro that I've been able to install and use. Even Netrunner/Arch gives me fits when I try to get my wifi going. I know it's purely KDE's fault and I've grown to hate KDE even more then I hate Unity.LOL.
    Xfce, MATE or maybe GNOME 3 and that's it for me and the desktops I like.
    "Now, what y'all wanna do?
    Wanna be hackers? Code crackers? Slackers
    Wastin' time with all the chatroom yakkers?
    9 to 5, chillin' at Hewlett Packard?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    Tried a few times to set up partitions and install Bridge and each time it was an epic fail. So far Manjaro is the only Arch based Distro that I've been able to install and use. Even Netrunner/Arch gives me fits when I try to get my wifi going. I know it's purely KDE's fault and I've grown to hate KDE even more then I hate Unity.LOL.
    Xfce, MATE or maybe GNOME 3 and that's it for me and the desktops I like.
    And yet it isnt KDE's developers that forgot what wifi was in Gnome 3.11

    Sure its back now but wifi status was a unheard of concept in gnome not so long ago, because they rather limit features and next gnome release they will probably forget what a bowel movement is.

  9. #9
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    I think the newest GNOME 3 that I've use was 3.10 in Ubuntu/GNOME and a Pure Debian install that I did. Had to put some firmware in the firmware folder in Debian for the wifi to work but other then that it'll ask if you want to connect to a hidden network. Not sure why KDE won't ask that from the wifi icon in the panel. Instead you have to hunt down your networking preferences and add it in and it still doesn't work.
    "Now, what y'all wanna do?
    Wanna be hackers? Code crackers? Slackers
    Wastin' time with all the chatroom yakkers?
    9 to 5, chillin' at Hewlett Packard?"

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    I think the newest GNOME 3 that I've use was 3.10 in Ubuntu/GNOME and a Pure Debian install that I did. Had to put some firmware in the firmware folder in Debian for the wifi to work but other then that it'll ask if you want to connect to a hidden network. Not sure why KDE won't ask that from the wifi icon in the panel. Instead you have to hunt down your networking preferences and add it in and it still doesn't work.
    KDE in debian never got along too well, its far better in other distros

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