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Give me a list of steps, from installing arch linux, to installing and running everything in this awesome desktop configuration. Keep it as simple as possible. s9(dot)postimg(dot)org/42c2hq3zj/1406836485214.png <- the desktop...
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  1. #1
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    Exclamation New to linux in general, PLEASE HELP!


    Give me a list of steps, from installing arch linux, to installing and running everything in this awesome desktop configuration.

    Keep it as simple as possible.

    s9(dot)postimg(dot)org/42c2hq3zj/1406836485214.png <- the desktop
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  2. #2
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    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/beginners%27_guide

    Arch Linux - awesome

    https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Awesome3

    If you are a novice you may want to start with fluxbox and work your way up to awesome

  3. #3
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    Good luck to you, this is not one I'd start with...

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  5. #4
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    You might be better off getting your "Arch Feet" wet by doing either a Manjaro or Antergos install. Both use pacman and the AUR, Manjaro has it's own Repos and schedule for updates but Antergos is full on Arch with daily updates. Either way it'd be easier to try one of those before you jump in head first with an Arch install.
    I've been using Linux(mostly Debian based but over the last 3 or so months Arch based via Manjaro and Antergos) for over a year and a half and I'm still not at the point where I feel comfortable trying to do an actual Arch Install.
    Anyway, good luck and I'll see ya' on the forums.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  6. #5
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    There may be a video on YouTube that will guide you through but tbh, like these guys said, start small. I have used debian based linux for over 2 years, attempted red hat linux and gentoo and realised I am still a novice even though I know a lot, I'll never know it all. And I'm guessing arch would be very alien to me. But good luck. At least it's linux you're going for

  7. #6
    Just Joined! YourPalMark's Avatar
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    If you're determined to try Arch, I'd install it with the Evo/Lution Arch installer. That will get you up and running with minimal drama while still providing a true Arch build. Of course there are many Arch users that consider such an install to be blasphemy, as if the challenging installation is some sort of "right of passage". Doing it the hard way can be educational, but most folk wind up following someones step-by-step tutorial and don't get much out of the tedious process anyway.
    elija likes this.

  8. #7
    Linux User nihili's Avatar
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    this.
    read like a bible and follow like a religion, and you shall be fine.
    although, archlinux is not for newbies. sorry.

  9. #8
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    So did you get a chance to give Manjaro or Antergos a look? Manjaro is kind of the "Ubuntu" of the Arch world which I don't think is a Bad Thing. Antergos is "real" Arch but much easier to install and you get to choose your desktop environment during install which is great because that way you only need one DVD/USB stick to install all of the desktops. With Manjaro I need to have a GNOME DVD/USB stick, an Xfce DVD/USB stick, ect. Of course since I've pretty much landed on Xfce as my "go to" desktop with GNOME coming in a close 2nd I only need to have DVD's and Live USB for those two desktops anyway so it's not a huge deal. Anyway, give Manjaro and Antergos a look and let us know what you think.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

  10. #9
    Linux User nihili's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YourPalMark View Post
    If you're determined to try Arch, I'd install it with the Evo/Lution Arch installer. That will get you up and running with minimal drama while still providing a true Arch build.
    i wanted to give this a try.
    i liked it at first, because it doesn't claim to be a distro.
    unfortunately it failed miserably - 3 times in a row.
    at first i tried to use xfs filesystem, that was a total no-go.
    then i tried the "install proprietary drivers" option - no go, installer just hangs.
    then i just went with all the default options, but halfway through installing the base system it just stopped doing anything and after half an hour i gave up.
    installing archlinux with the wiki on a 2nd machine is much easier.

    i then tried manjaro; unfortunately their installer isn't so great either, but on the 3rd attempt i managed to install, with a little tweaking. there clearly is a reason why the version number hasn't reached 1.0 yet.

    please don't get me wrong, once it's installed manjaro is great. it helped me to install some of the trickier stuff which i never quite managed to set up properly on my manual arch install (like gnome keyring and polkit stuff). and it's still plenty archlinux.
    but a newbie would have been lost with the installer quirks.

    (the hardware is fairly normal - a 2008 desktop - nvidia gpu that works well with nouveau, amd motherboard)

  11. #10
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    If you want Real Arch without the hassle then just do an Antergos install. It'll get you an Arch install with some extras and it's uber easy to do. If you want Arch with a bit of a "buffer" then Manjaro is great. Also easy to move from Stable to Testing or Unstable(same as Arch Stable) and Manjaro has a great community and forum to hang out on as well.
    No matter where ya' go, there ya' are.

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