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  1. #1

    Any working with Arch based distros


    I had started this journey with Ubuntu Linux 14.04, dabbled with Mint Linux 17. Then started going hardcore when I switched from Debian to Arch based distros. Started with Antergos for a little bit, then tried Manjaro. I then went to Archmerge. When I tried to install ArchmergeD, all I got was a black screen when trying to install. Doesn't make it easy to install when you can't see anything! So, now I am doing Archlabs openbox. I am thinking of installing Arch Linux on my news HDD. Anyway, it's a learning experience, and I'm having fun. My wife keeps saying are with your second wife again?! Lol

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Just Joined! kjm007's Avatar
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    Try my top distro: Revenge OS

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by kjm007 View Post
    Try my top distro: Revenge OS
    Looks interesting, but my goal is to try to build my system literally from the ground up. Its the best way to learn Linux also makes you learn every part of your OS. Also, its a good way to learn how to trouble shoot and solve problems. I guess I'm into 'self abuse. ' lol Are you going to try other OS or you just setting up a system for a particular goal in mind?

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy_Pipili View Post
    Looks interesting, but my goal is to try to build my system literally from the ground up.
    I recommend this.
    It is not so bad or 'leet' or 'hardcore' as some people claim.
    it has one BIG advantage against arch-based:
    you know what you did, (almost) every step of the way.
    To provide support, we have the expectation that you know the decisions that were made about your machine at the time of the install.
    also: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginner%27s_Guide

  6. #5
    Linux Newbie sarlacii's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy_Pipili View Post
    Looks interesting, but my goal is to try to build my system literally from the ground up. Its the best way to learn Linux also makes you learn every part of your OS. Also, its a good way to learn how to trouble shoot and solve problems. I guess I'm into 'self abuse. ' lol Are you going to try other OS or you just setting up a system for a particular goal in mind?

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk
    Greetings. I've just recently setup an Arch Linux distro on the old PC connected to my TV. I chose Arch because it still had support for i586 32-bit processors. I was initially caught out by the need to do the whole fundamental setup from scratch thing, as I just wanted to get the system going, but I found that the Arch Linux guys have an excellent website and lots of community support. In fact, I often end up on their site when looking for solutions to Linux stuff.

    So in short I recommend Arch if you want to learn. The install readme was great, but it was a little light when it came to getting the network to connect after installing from the live distro. Bizarrely, the live distro ran the network fine, allowing you to chroot and do the install on the PC HDD, but when you boot into the new install, the network doesn't work until you generate the configs. Watch out for that one.

    Let us know how it goes.
    Respectfully... Sarlac II
    ~~
    The moving clock K' appears to K to run slow by the factor (1-v^2/c^2)^(1/2).
    This is the phenomenon of time dilation.
    The faster you run, the younger you look, to everyone but yourself.

  7. #6
    Arch and Manjaro user here- with the latter on my main Intel rig for gaming and video editing. Arch was definitely a challenge at first - getting the NIC to be recognised by MAC address, chrooting and mounting all partitions with proper mountpoints after an update made the system unbootable, making sure that Enlightenment loaded properly - but it's been worth it. It's nice to know how to build from scratch, but given how much more complete Manjaro is out of the box, I'll stick with it as my daily driver.

    Sent from my LG-M210 using Tapatalk

  8. #7
    True, right now I have Archlabs openbox on my machine, which is down at the moment. My PSU went out and I have to wait until it comes in. Talk about being bummed! And I was about ready to put Arch Linux on my new HDD. Maybe God is trying to tell me something! But in the mean time, I am spending more time with my Galaxy tab s3 and catching up on some reading.

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk

  9. #8
    Manjaro is nice and all. But I find it's more hampering than useful. They only thing I would like to take from Manjaro for any arch based distro is the mhwd utility. Other than that I find that Manjaro Dev's are too slow at updating some packages which causes breakage when you do weekly updates. Not every time... But sometimes. Also I can NEVER get certain apps to function right under Manjaro and I have no issue building from AUR manually. They just don't work right. Even if I convert a fresh install to straight Arch. But a fresh Arch base install. Works flawlessly. Not sure what's different. Manjaro is great for a test drive.

    But for a daily driver I strongly recommend just using a spare rig and diving right in installing base with nothing but the Arch install guide open on your tablet! If you don't feel too great about your Arch skills right off the get go. Re-install. Install proprietary graphics drivers. Heck, Recompile the kernel. In a week using nothing but Arch and fixing your own breakages you get pretty good with it. I've been using Arch pretty consistently for about 7 years and Gentoo more recently. I use Gentoo in addition to Arch as Gentoo doesn't quite do everything I want yet I find myself switching back to Arch to just get things done the way they should be.

  10. #9
    Yes, Manjaro has some good things about it. But Archmerge I think is the the better distro if you want to step from Debian based to Arch based distros. I couldn't get ArchmergeD to work right off the bat. When trying to install from a live drive, after the splash screen, all I got was a black screen. Then go with Archlabs openbox desk environment. You can also copy some of the best features on your thumb drive, and when you're ready for the big league, Arch Linux! I haven't tried gentoo based yet, but thinking about it.

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vi2nano View Post
    Manjaro is nice and all. But I find it's more hampering than useful. They only thing I would like to take from Manjaro for any arch based distro is the mhwd utility. Other than that I find that Manjaro Dev's are too slow at updating some packages which causes breakage when you do weekly updates. Not every time... But sometimes. Also I can NEVER get certain apps to function right under Manjaro and I have no issue building from AUR manually. They just don't work right. Even if I convert a fresh install to straight Arch. But a fresh Arch base install. Works flawlessly. Not sure what's different. Manjaro is great for a test drive.

    But for a daily driver I strongly recommend just using a spare rig and diving right in installing base with nothing but the Arch install guide open on your tablet! If you don't feel too great about your Arch skills right off the get go. Re-install. Install proprietary graphics drivers. Heck, Recompile the kernel. In a week using nothing but Arch and fixing your own breakages you get pretty good with it. I've been using Arch pretty consistently for about 7 years and Gentoo more recently. I use Gentoo in addition to Arch as Gentoo doesn't quite do everything I want yet I find myself switching back to Arch to just get things done the way they should be.
    You know what? After debating and researching and being implored to switch to Arch, I intend to. It was in part laziness that drove me to Manjaro (the other was mhwd and what seemed like a more thoughtful update cycle), but today I'll be installing Arch on my main rig. Your arguments are compelling. Admittedly, the Manjaro community is less condescending than Arch's, but c'est la vie.

    Sent from my LG-M210 using Tapatalk

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