Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 6 of 6
Well, I'm located in Washington state, and the only real location for IT ( for lack of a broader term ) careers is in Seattle and the surrounding area. I'm ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Newbie SagaciousKJB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Yakima, WA
    Posts
    162

    Is Linux+ certification worth it?


    Well, I'm located in Washington state, and the only real location for IT ( for lack of a broader term ) careers is in Seattle and the surrounding area. I'm interested in work with Linux, and I hear there are some good opportunities in the area, but I'm wondering if I should bother with certification. From what I understand, a lot of the companies that employ Linux don't base it off of certifications because they're use to people having a lot of certificates, but not actually having any knowledge. From what I was told, there's typically some kind of entry-level test, and then on-the-site training. That's what I would prefer, really.

    The thing is, the certification isn't terribly expensive, and after reviewing some study guides for it, I'm reasonably sure I could pass it in a few tries without breaking my budget too much. I'm just wondering if it's really worth it; I don't think I will get anything higher than entry level with or without it, and if I began working for a company entry-level, they might even be able to pay for it.

    So, I'm reaching out here in hopes that anyone has experience with this.

  2. #2
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    West Yorks
    Posts
    4,393
    In terms of Linux Certification, the most regarded certifications are the RHCT/RHCE from Red Hat and the LPI certification program. Linux+ is ok as an entry level cert, but I think you would be better off doing the LPI level 1 cert.

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie SagaciousKJB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Yakima, WA
    Posts
    162
    Is there any sort of central place that I could find details of where to purchase the certificates/tests and find study guides for them? I use "study guide" for lack of a better term, I would just like to know what is on the test before I take it like any other person would.

    I've Google'd for "certification resources", but it tends to only reveal the sites from the company or organization offering it. I'm wondering if there are any sort of independent reviewers/listers; like a dslreports for IT certifications.

    I'm going to keep Google'ing, I'm sure I can find one somewhere, but I hope someone here can mention one just in case I don't find any.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    West Yorks
    Posts
    4,393
    For Red Hat, look here. For LPI, look here.

  6. #5
    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    541
    The Linux+ Certification may not be well respected around here, but it will get the attention of employers. It shows them you took the time to get it, and it will also alert them of your Linux knowledge. Other than that though, it won't do much else.

    It isn't hard and isn't expensive, but IMO it is worth it if the employee notices that hey, this guy knows about Linux. Be prepared to answer more in depth Linux questions in the interview.

    I would also suggest the LPI certification. I prefer non-vendor specific certs, so that will be another one that employers will look at.

    It really depends on what area you are in. Linux+ may not have much of an impact where you are from, but if you are from a place where Linux is unheard of, anything on your resume to highlight your Linux knowledge/awareness to an employer is a plus.

    Although, they types of network or Linux jobs around here don't pay very well. Most start at around $35k - $40k, and top out at around $60k.

    *edit*
    Maybe get your Linux+ Cert, get an entry level admin job, and have the company you work for pay for your LPI Cert. That works sometimes if the company is respectable and they want to further their employee's knowledge.

    Linux User #376741
    Code is Poetry

  7. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    0

    Linux Certifications

    I used to be a UNIX Sysadmin for 10 years before Y2K. I saw fewer and fewer UNIX jobs advertised, so I had to learn about Microsoft products. I'm Microsoft MCSE and MCITP certified as well as CompTIA A+, Network+, Security+ and Server+ certified. My job involves traveling outside the US. I have to say that the CompTIA certifications are not well recognized outside the US. That is why I decided to go for the LPI certifications instead of Linux+.

    Another reason I want to become LPI certified, is go get back at Microsoft for causing all the UNIX jobs and Programmer jobs to disappear. My UNiX admin skills should help me when I take these exams. Oh sure there are some differences, like using /bin/bash instead of /bin/csh. Even though GNU stands for :GNU's Not Unix" there still are some similarities.

    Right now I'm working in an all Microsoft shop. I'll be stuck doing that until I retire. Before I retire, I want to become Linux certified and teach adult ed classes about free alternatives to Microsoft's bloatware. Since Windows Vista, I decided that Microsoft's future seems kind of questionable.

    I've switched all of my computers at home to Linux. I've tried a dozen different flavors of Linux. Linux Mint is now my favorite. The LPI exams stress Debian and Red Hat. I was unsuccessful installing both of these on a single computer with a dual boot. I have decided to run them both using VirtualBox with Linux Mint instead.

    I plan to take the LPI exams in the next 6 months. One problem I have, is that these LPI certifications expire after 5 years. I will need to recertify several times before I retire. That's ok, because I've had it up to my ears with Microsoft. It's a nice change to get back into a UNIX like operating system and actually do some programming again.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •