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I guess this is the only forum I can post this question in, since it's not directly related to Linux. But I know there are a lot of very knowledgeable ...
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  1. #1
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    Thermal interface material


    I guess this is the only forum I can post this question in, since it's not directly related to Linux. But I know there are a lot of very knowledgeable people on this forum, so I thought I'd give it a try:

    I got an Athlon 64 processor from online, and it came with a heatsink with some gray thermal interface material stuck to it. So I installed that. But I recently found out that the motherboard on which I installed it doesn't support Linux, so I got a different one. When I removed the processor and heatsink from the first motherboard, though, the T.I.M. stayed stuck to both pieces, like sometimes when you pull an Oreo apart. So here's my question: now that the stuff is globbed to both components, do I need to wipe it off and get some more, or should it be alright to just stick them back together in the new board?
    Situations arise because of the weather,
    And no kinds of love are better than others.

  2. #2
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    That's a good questions...I don't know but I would wipe it off and put new stuff on just to be sure

  3. #3
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    yeah wipe it off and put more on.

    Even if its still "gooey", the interaction with air would have "hurt" its thermal protection properties....

    If i remember correctly, that stuff is supposed to fill in the imperfections of the heatsink, so that the heat transfer is better.
    If you stick it back on, and there are more gaps than "normal", than the heat won't be properly transfered from the cpu to the heatsink... resulting in a lack of performance at first, and eventually a dead AMD64 chip.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    I would actually head to Radio Shack and get some heatsink thermal paste (or order some Arctic Silver from http://www.highspeedpc.com) as the stuff that ususally comes with the HSF's is crap comparitively.
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  5. #5
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    By the way: do you know any product for wipe that off ? with paper is dificult :X

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer Giro's Avatar
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    I have always used cotton wool buds (Things people clean there ears with) with a bit of water and get it nice and clean. If its epoxy then its a ***** to get off!!

  7. #7
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    Oh! Don't forget to clean both surfaces with rubbing alcohol before you apply the new thermal grease (and let them dry, of course).
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
    ~Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the advice! I would totally have fried my CPU if it weren't for you guys.
    Situations arise because of the weather,
    And no kinds of love are better than others.

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