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Has anyone had any positive experiences with Windows 7? I'm currently running Windows 7 at home on two laptops, a desktop, and numerous virtual machines that run off a Hyper-V ...
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    Has anyone had any positive experiences with Windows 7?


    Has anyone had any positive experiences with Windows 7? I'm currently running Windows 7 at home on two laptops, a desktop, and numerous virtual machines that run off a Hyper-V server. Up until now, I've been primarily using the Enterprise and Ultimate versions of Windows 7.

    So far I've been really impressed with Windows 7. Very stable and works well even on older hardware. Windows 7 doesn’t seem to have the performance issues that plagued Windows Vista. It certainly doesn’t thrash the hard drive the same way Windows Vista did.

    The new Windows deployment and imaging tools make working with Windows 7 far easier than previous versions of Windows. I've done a few backups, installations, and restores for other people that went well and were finished in a few hours. I like being able to create a customized build for someone and then immedately grab a backup image in case something goes wrong later.

    I haven't tested the BitLocker or AppLocker features yet. The HomeGroup feature works well and was easy to setup.

    Has anyone else had any positive experiences with Windows 7 so far?

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    I haven't used it. That's about as positive as it gets I think.

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    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    dmengo, I have had similar positive experiences with Windows 7.

    I am running it on my desktop and my 2 other computers now (wife's laptop and a media pc). It is actually fast, stable, and if all your pc's are Win7, then the networking is extremely simple. No hard drive thrashing, runs well on older pc's, and the media capabilities are nice. Bitlocker looks promising although I haven't tried it yet.

    I am also running a Windows Home Server on an old pc someone gave me and throwing as many hard drives as I can at it. Automated backups, media serving, and remote administration are all nice advantages.

    I haven't turned into a Microsoft junkie yet, but 7 impressed me to the point of using it.

    Of course, I wouldn't have bought it outright, I am a technet member. I also don't like all of the DRM in silverlight, but as a netflix subscriber, I have to use silverlight if I want to stream anything.

    All in all, it is a good, solid os.

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    I was surpised myself that Windows 7 is working out so well. Microsoft finally got their act together and produced a decent client OS.

    I just wish Microsoft would lower their prices a bit as the retail versions are overpriced. I've been recommending to people to go out an purchase the OEM system builder versions of Windows 7.

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    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    Can't afford Retail Price and am Not Privy to free Windows as a Student or Whatever. How ever. My Wife seems to like Windows 7. And my positive experience is it keeps her from asking. "How do I do this on your computer".
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    Windows 7 works, but..

    I have windows 7 on all three of my machines. and have had no issues with it. The thing is, They could have had all of the Vista remedies included in 7 implemented in a Vista SP years ago, but they insisted on a campaign to convince people that there was nothing wrong with vista in the first place.

    I'm not going to say Microsoft doesn't make a quality product. They do, for home and client users that is. For servers there is no other way to go besides Linux. Just opinion there.

    I will say this, they didn't learn from one of the most common issues people had with vista. "Which one do I buy?" I think There should be two versions, A netbook, or "light" version if you will, and a regular. I also believe that The most recent office productivity suite should be included if they are going to charge $300 and up. Otherwise I think $150 or so is a fair price.

    The number one reason I don't use Windows is this. I like the idea that anyone can identify a security hole in Linux and fix it. In Linux, to fix something, there is no cost/benefit analysis to be done. In the commercial software world, if it is not cost effective to fix a security issue, it wont be fixed, or worse it may be hidden to avert bad press. My other reason I like Linux is more trivial, I don't was customization to be limited to a wallpaper and a color scheme.

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    That's all I have to say about that..
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    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    Can't afford Retail Price and am Not Privy to free Windows as a Student or Whatever.
    Never pay retail prices for Windows. Just buy the OEM versions from NewEgg.com. They have the Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit edition available for $175.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Djarum View Post
    I have windows 7 on all three of my machines. and have had no issues with it. The thing is, They could have had all of the Vista remedies included in 7 implemented in a Vista SP years ago, but they insisted on a campaign to convince people that there was nothing wrong with vista in the first place.
    I agree 100%. I knew Windows Vista was in trouble when they weren't shipping netbooks with Vista installed. Microsoft instead brought back Windows XP from the grave.

    Quote Originally Posted by Djarum View Post
    The number one reason I don't use Windows is this. I like the idea that anyone can identify a security hole in Linux and fix it. In Linux, to fix something, there is no cost/benefit analysis to be done. In the commercial software world, if it is not cost effective to fix a security issue, it wont be fixed, or worse it may be hidden to avert bad press.
    Keep in mind that Linux developers don't work for free. I think a lot of people falsely have this assumption that just because something is open-source software that developers work on it out of the kindness of their hearts. They need to eat and put food on the table so to speak. No one is going to bother fixing any security issue unless they get paid to do so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dmengo View Post
    Keep in mind that Linux developers don't work for free. I think a lot of people falsely have this assumption that just because something is open-source software that developers work on it out of the kindness of their hearts. They need to eat and put food on the table so to speak. No one is going to bother fixing any security issue unless they get paid to do so.
    Yes, I understand this concept, however, there are enough people out there working on Linux, that do it as their hobby to identify and fix problems that "Company X" may choose put on the back burner while they focus on their commercial products first. With other operating systems, you are at the sole mercy of the company that holds the source. There may be hundreds of flaws in their OS that they know about but wont fix so long as the public is unaware.

    One thing people sometimes forget is that the single greatest threat to the security of any computer or network is the user. I firmly believe that the reason Linux is harder to penetrate than windows has less to do with the OS but more to do with users who unknowingly give the attacker access. I.e. the gnome-look screensaver that was packaged in a .deb and tricked the user into giving root access to the attacking software. This was not a flaw in Linux, this was an example of how attackers exploit users who don't know any better. Should Linux become more viable to the more casual users with a less intimate knowledge of how their system works, we will see a lot more of this.

    When you run a program that windows doesn't recognize and implicitly trust, you are prompted, or should be prompted that giving the program access to your system may pose a security risk. Not many casual users think much about it before clicking "yes." Because Linux is geared more for the enthusiast, it's user base tends to know what to trust and what not to. This will not be the case if Linux begins to take more market share of the "average Joe" users.

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmengo View Post
    Has anyone had any positive experiences with Windows 7? I'm currently running Windows 7 at home on two laptops, a desktop, and numerous virtual machines that run off a Hyper-V server. Up until now, I've been primarily using the Enterprise and Ultimate versions of Windows 7.

    So far I've been really impressed with Windows 7. Very stable and works well even on older hardware. Windows 7 doesn’t seem to have the performance issues that plagued Windows Vista. It certainly doesn’t thrash the hard drive the same way Windows Vista did.

    The new Windows deployment and imaging tools make working with Windows 7 far easier than previous versions of Windows. I've done a few backups, installations, and restores for other people that went well and were finished in a few hours. I like being able to create a customized build for someone and then immedately grab a backup image in case something goes wrong later.

    I haven't tested the BitLocker or AppLocker features yet. The HomeGroup feature works well and was easy to setup.

    Has anyone else had any positive experiences with Windows 7 so far?

    There have been several threads on this already.

    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/cof...ce-3-days.html

    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/cof...-purchase.html

    Short answer: yes. The vast majority of people have had quite pleasant experiences. I tried using BitLocker and wasn't able to since it requires a piece of hardware that my laptop lacks.
    Registered Linux user #270181
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