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Originally Posted by techieMoe Just an anecdote: generally demo units in stores get pretty beat up. I don't know how long this particular nook hat been sitting there, but it ...
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  1. #21
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe View Post
    Just an anecdote: generally demo units in stores get pretty beat up. I don't know how long this particular nook hat been sitting there, but it looked like it had put up with some use and stood up well. The buttons were still responsive and clicky (rather than loose, as demo units can tend to be). Again, I don't know how hard it was abused; just that this one seemed pretty tough.
    Thanks, that's good to know. For my wife (and I'm serious), any electronic gadget needs to be able to withstand being slept on, sat on, stepped on, juggled, accidentally tossed into the air at heights of up to 10 feet and then bounce off the ground, soft drink spills, occasional dips in the tub, or toilet, and the horrific repeated pounding of the keys when it doesn't do what she wants it to do.

    I've asked her many times to be more gentle with electronic gadgetry, but it hasn't worked so far. Not giving up, though!
    oz

  2. #22
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar View Post
    Thanks, that's good to know. For my wife (and I'm serious), any electronic gadget needs to be able to withstand being slept on, sat on, stepped on, juggled, accidentally tossed into the air at heights of up to 10 feet and then bounce off the ground, soft drink spills, occasional dips in the tub, or toilet, and the horrific repeated pounding of the keys when it doesn't do what she wants it to do.

    I've asked her many times to be more gentle with electronic gadgetry, but it hasn't worked so far. Not giving up, though!
    The nook has an introductory document done by Dave Barry that sounds a bit like what you just described. I can't remember the exact wording, but it had stuff like "Care and Handling Instructions: Do not put your nook in a blender without a very good reason..."
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  3. #23
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    This kind of device is out of the question for me.
    The DRM is a show stopper, not to mention the
    price. I can get paperback books almost for free.
    If I want an electronic version, I prefer reading
    HTML on my computer. I can make the type any size
    or change the font. Fixed formats like pdf are
    only good when printed.

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Let me first say that you're welcome to enjoy literature however you like. I'm not trying to change your mind there. I just wanted to rebut some things you said in the interest of playing Devil's Advocate.

    Quote Originally Posted by rcgreen View Post
    This kind of device is out of the question for me.
    The DRM is a show stopper,
    This one's fair enough. Some of us are more bothered by the idea than others. At least the nook supports DRM-free stuff too (like unlocked ePUB files).

    ...not to mention the price. I can get paperback books almost for free.
    I guess that depends on what you read. For me, most of the stuff I read is mass market paperbacks that I can't generally find used, so I end up paying around $6-8USD per book, which is about the same (sometimes more) than the ebook versions I've seen. I can also download books from the city library and from Baen Free Library for free and read them on the device.

    If I want an electronic version, I prefer reading
    HTML on my computer. I can make the type any size
    or change the font. Fixed formats like pdf are
    only good when printed.
    Not me. I can't read full-length books on an LCD screen. My eyes start to go after about an hour. Low-light situations are worse. It's like shining a flashlight in my eyes. Not to mention my computer is about ten times as heavy and bulky (and gets terrible battery life) in comparison to a reader.

    But to each their own. I don't believe eReaders will be replacing ink and paper for many, many years to come, if ever. I see the two technologies living side-by-side for some time.
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  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe View Post
    I see the two technologies living side-by-side for some time.
    That's exactly what I see happening, with e-readers continually gaining ground and making improvements, and most paper docs eventually becoming too expensive for the majority of folks. Hopefully, we'll all have what we prefer for some time to come.
    oz

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    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techieMoe View Post
    Last night I got to actually play with the Barnes & Noble nook in the store. It's a very cool little gadget. There are some neat little incentives they offer that Amazon does not (and basically can't):

    1. Bring your nook into the store and it connects to the store's WiFi, giving you in-store discounts and the ability to browse the full text of any book in the store (that has an ebook version) just like if you picked it off a shelf.

    2. Free book downloads that change on a regular basis for in-store nook readers only.

    After playing with the nook l'm conflicted. I immediately started doing more research this morning and I discovered that for most purposes the Kindle and nook are identical, including their hardware. There was one significant advantage that I found for the nook though: libraries.

    My local municipal library lends out ebooks using several formats, including Adobe Digital Editions, MobiBooks, and ePub. The nook supports ADE and ePub, the Kindle does not support any of the above. So even in the event that Barnes & Noble goes under, I can still check out books from the library and read them on the device for the foreseeable future. That's a definite plus in my book. The nook also uses Google's Android as its OS for those of you who care.
    So, a few notes on these.

    First off, the Kindle does support Mobipocket files. You can see the supported files at:
    Amazon.com Help: Transferring, Downloading, and Sending Files

    Also, although you can't browse the full text of any Kindle book, you can download a sample of the book which usually contains the first one or two chapters. So you can try out at least the beginning of any book.

    The Kindle also offers a number of deals and free downloads. I've downloaded several books for free from the Kindle store. I'll point you here which has a list of some of them:
    Amazon.com: Great Deals on Kindle

    They also have a Kindle magazine of sorts that is accessible from the device that talks about some of the latest offers for the Kindle.

    I've never tried a Nook, so I don't know much about it, but I do find the Kindle excellent, as I've said .

  8. #27
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cabhan View Post
    So, a few notes on these.

    First off, the Kindle does support Mobipocket files. You can see the supported files at:
    Amazon.com Help: Transferring, Downloading, and Sending Files
    I've read that to read MOBI files you have to run things through some sort of Python script and scrub the DRM out of them. That seems to be a bit more work than the drag-and-drop ePUB files on the nook.

    Kindle Mobipocket Reading MobiPocket Books on the Kindle Kindle Review Kindle 2 Review, Books

    That could be old information though.

    Also, although you can't browse the full text of any Kindle book, you can download a sample of the book which usually contains the first one or two chapters. So you can try out at least the beginning of any book.
    Nook does this too, and yeah it's better than nothing. I wasn't necessarily discounting samples, just that I can't walk into an Amazon store and... well I can't walk into one at all. Haha. You get in-store discounts at B&N with a nook. It may not mean much to some people, but it's value added for me.

    The Kindle also offers a number of deals and free downloads. I've downloaded several books for free from the Kindle store. I'll point you here which has a list of some of them:
    Amazon.com: Great Deals on Kindle

    They also have a Kindle magazine of sorts that is accessible from the device that talks about some of the latest offers for the Kindle.
    They sure do love their trashy romance novels on these kinds of lists, don't they? The nook freebie list is similarly populated. Good to know that the Kindle offers free stuff too, though.

    I've never tried a Nook, so I don't know much about it, but I do find the Kindle excellent, as I've said .
    It's always good to hear other sides! Thanks for the heads up. I haven't bought either one yet, and I'm still kind of on the fence at the moment. I know I want one or the other. I'm just sort of leaning toward the nook for now.
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    While I prefer real books, I'd love to have an e-reader for those times when using one would be more convenient, so I'll likely purchase one as soon as they are more affordable. The prices still seem overly steep at the moment.
    oz

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozar View Post
    While I prefer real books, I'd love to have an e-reader for those times when using one would be more convenient, so I'll likely purchase one as soon as they are more affordable. The prices still seem overly steep at the moment.
    They are definitely well out of the "impulse buy" category at the moment. I've seen them as low as $150, but they don't have the 3G modem.
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  11. #30
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    I purchased an eReader today, and it should arrive some time later this week. After all my back and forth about the advantages/disadvantages of this or that device I ended up with a Kindle.

    I liked a lot of the features of the Barnes & Noble nook, but I went back to the store and played with it several more times and realized that there were still a lot of performance bugs in it, and I wasn't sure I was ready to throw down $260 for a first-gen device.

    Thanks to Cabhan, there is hope for being able to read library books on the Kindle in MOBI format. I'll be posting an article about my experience after a week or so of using it.
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