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i currently use gentoo, i like it but it generaly has a feeling now of almost being much less maintained than it should be, some packages remain "unstable" for like ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    constantly updated distro


    i currently use gentoo, i like it but it generaly has a feeling now of almost being much less maintained than it should be, some packages remain "unstable" for like ever, also compiling everything is getting a little old for some things.

    what i liked about it though was it had packages for almost everything, and it was kinda a always latest software version system, as in there isnt any gentoo 1, 2, 3, 4 or any of that crap, just all the packages are there, and they all have various versions and you usually had a pretty new version installed.

    i also relay like debian, but the problem with it is it has these release versions, i was wondering if the debian testing branch was always going to be testing if you had it installed, from the way it seems to be to me now, the current testing branch will eventualy become the new stable release, and now you will have to move on to the new testing branch in order to still keep getting new versions of packages.

    oh, another annoying problem with gentoo is it requires special update mechanics to update at certain times, usualy about 6 months apart and it could require extremely special update methods for some packages such as xorg and the like.

    oh, and i wouldnt like ubuntu, its name is lame its catch phrase is lame, and its known to be a pretty hacky extension onto debian.
    nVidia G-Force 6600GT (bfg) pci-e: amd 64 2000+ (939): 1024 corsair ram: 2X 80gb seagate harddisk SATA: plextor cd/dvd-read/write cdrom SATA

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer GNU-Fan's Avatar
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    If you don't mind tightening a loose screw now and then, have a look into Debian Unstable. After using Gentoo, I see no reason to be afraid of it.

    Hint: Keep a small backup partition with Stable/Testing though.
    Debian GNU/Linux -- You know you want it.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru coopstah13's Avatar
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    if you use debian and want to use testing always, in the sources.list file you can just use testing instead of the next release code name (squeeze)

    you could consider arch linux, it is rolling release and very up to date, currently it runs kernel 2.6.32.7

  4. #4
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    +1 for using Arch. It's like Gentoo+Slackware with all the benefits and none of the downsides. (Well, ok, arguably Slackware might be more stable than Arch.)

    You have the Arch Build System, which is a ports like system, for those times you really want to build from source or need a custom build of some software.

    The official repos are fairly deep, but you also have the Arch User Repository, which contains build scripts for tons of software. I've really never found anything I wanted missing from there.

    The Arch build scripts, called PKGBUILDS are fairly similar to Gentoo's ebuilds, and relatively simple to understand, if you are inclined to add to the AUR, or otherwise need to edit a script from there.

    And of course, it's rolling release, just as you want.

    Otherwise, you might also check out Sidux, another rolling release distro that tracks Debian Unstable. My problem with Sidux is that the contortions and hacks they go through to make it stable seem a little too fragile for me. All sorts of fancy apt-pinning and such.

  5. #5
    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    probably go with debian testing branch, that sounds like the best option. arch sounded ok, its basically like a binary gentoo, both use bsd style init and both have no initial configuration for packages.

    debian i always liked because they had a really long and strong backing, and released some pretty stable packages. they also wont allow non free programs into their repositories but have an extension onto their repository system to allow you to add extra sources to keep up to date non free packages.

    probably the biggest concern with me with a distro is i absolutely do not like having a big glob of software installed, most of witch i don't want there, don't want running in the background and that i wouldn't notice is their until i search for it.
    nVidia G-Force 6600GT (bfg) pci-e: amd 64 2000+ (939): 1024 corsair ram: 2X 80gb seagate harddisk SATA: plextor cd/dvd-read/write cdrom SATA

  6. #6
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    probably the biggest concern with me with a distro is i absolutely do not like having a big glob of software installed, most of witch i don't want there, don't want running in the background and that i wouldn't notice is their until i search for it.
    Arch is generally pretty good about limiting dependencies to only what is necessarily to run, and putting anything else in an optional depends list. And again, it's not to hard to build the occasional package yourself and remove anything unwanted. Or in many cases, it is done for you with a package posted to the AUR. I know there is an Abiword package on the AUR, for example, with all the GNOME crap removed.

    As for stuff running in the background, Arch doesn't start any daemons that you don't tell it to. Every daemon you want to run goes in an array in /etc/rc.conf.

  7. #7
    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    ugh, ya, one thing i dont want, i dont want any kde/gt crap installed (i hate qt, i htink its retarded) and i dont like gnome specific libraries installed for apllications that wont need gnome at all to run.
    nVidia G-Force 6600GT (bfg) pci-e: amd 64 2000+ (939): 1024 corsair ram: 2X 80gb seagate harddisk SATA: plextor cd/dvd-read/write cdrom SATA

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