Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
I now seem to have 3 boxes running Linux and am still a little bit at sea with all the differences from Windows. I'd like to know more as what ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5

    Recommendations for Linux books


    I now seem to have 3 boxes running Linux and am still a little bit at sea with all the differences from Windows.

    I'd like to know more as what I know and have cobbled together so far has been interesting, but I'd kind of like to dig a little deeper.

    I also have one eye on populating my Amazon wishlist as apparently I'm hard to by Xmas presents for!

    So has anyone got any recommendations for some good Linux books? Basically something that will bring me up to speed with some of the command line stuff (one of my linux boxes is a NAS (mybook), so this bit is pretty important) and some tips on how to find my way around the place.

    I had a look at the 'for dummies' series and there seem to be 2 which might suit. Has anyone got them? Were they any use?

    Any tips / pointers gratefully received.

    E.M.

  2. #2
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    Most of the books published by O'Reilly are pretty good and they usually have good prices on them at Amazon.

    I personally liked the following books:

    Running Linux, 4th Edition (O'Reilly)
    Linux Cookbook by Carla Schroeder (O'Reilly)
    The Linux Cookbook by Michael Stutz

    Note that there might be newer editions on the above books.
    oz

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5
    Thanks for that, I'd steered a little clear of the o'reilly titles as they mostly seemed far to specific, although I think my rough search through amazon doesn't bring up the best titles (they mostly seem to be linux for administrators or how to install linus guides...).

    Will take a look at the titles mentioned.

    Are any of the e-books to the left worth it? I clicked on one of them and it wanted a fair few details so I didn't carry on.

  4. #4

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    928
    Another book which was recommended to me, is Linux in a Nutshell. Haven't tried it yet, but it seems to be well regarded.

  6. #6
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    Quote Originally Posted by MASONTX View Post
    Another book which was recommended to me, is Linux in a Nutshell. Haven't tried it yet, but it seems to be well regarded.
    I have Linux in a Nutshell and it is a good book. Keep in mind that it contains mostly a listing of the various commands used on the command line along with lots of tips and options for using them. It also briefly goes over various components of Linux such as bootloaders, command line editors, Gnome, KDE, and a some package managers.
    oz

  7. #7
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,159
    Quote Originally Posted by ozar View Post
    I have Linux in a Nutshell and it is a good book. Keep in mind that it contains mostly a listing of the various commands used on the command line along with lots of tips and options for using them. It also briefly goes over various components of Linux such as bootloaders, command line editors, Gnome, KDE, and a some package managers.
    Hence the title, "Linux in a Nutshell"... Nothing extensive. Just enough to get you going. Useful, but not encyclopedic.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Harrow, UK
    Posts
    1,167
    The trouble with "For dummies" books and "Idiot guides" is that, while well-written, they tend to be distro-specific (usually Fedora or Ubuntu). The O'Reilly books are more generally about Linux.

    I found Running Linux very useful for practical purposes. But the book which really opened my eyes to the internals of Linux was not about Linux at all; it was called Unix System Programming. Unfortunately I can't remember the author's name, but it was probably published by O'Reilly.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nottingham, England
    Posts
    3,807
    Quote Originally Posted by hazel View Post
    The trouble with "For dummies" books and "Idiot guides" is that, while well-written, they tend to be distro-specific (usually Fedora or Ubuntu). The O'Reilly books are more generally about Linux.

    I found Running Linux very useful for practical purposes. But the book which really opened my eyes to the internals of Linux was not about Linux at all; it was called Unix System Programming. Unfortunately I can't remember the author's name, but it was probably published by O'Reilly.
    Would it have been this one? Or maybe this one?
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  10. #10
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5
    Thanks for all the suggestions, after perusing amazon / ebay for the prices, I finally plumped for 'Running Linux' (looks official, slightly more sensible) and 'The Linux Cookbook by Michael Stutz' (Looks slightly less serious and has a jaunty yellow cover (always important))

    Hopefully these 2 will get me started and fill in some holes!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •