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I started on Ubuntu a while back and loved it (LOVED it). Recently though, I've decided to explore with different other distros and see what they offer. I'd like to ...
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  1. #1
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    Why Anything but Ubuntu?


    I started on Ubuntu a while back and loved it (LOVED it). Recently though, I've decided to explore with different other distros and see what they offer.

    I'd like to know what advantages other distros have to offer?

    Ubuntu has great stability, perfect for development, very user-friendly, and of course perhaps the best online support base there is. Not trying to start flame wars here, but I think those are pretty well-agreed upon.

    I've grown partial to Backtrack, which is now essentially Ubuntu with KDE and a butt-load of analysis software, but my biggest issue is I hate being logged in as root.

    A lot of those programs can be made to be run on Ubuntu. The important ones that can't you can use a VM for, or a live DVD/USB. I imagine when it comes to programs that come with some distros, they can be made to run under Ubuntu as well.

    Only exception I can see the benefit of is OpenBSD. I'm just not seeing what any other Linux distro has that can't be made to work well on Ubuntu one way or another.

    Anyone with me or against me on this one? I'd actually appreciate contrary opinions so I can learn a bit about why y'all like your distros.

  2. #2
    oz
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    I've tried countless releases of 50 or 60 different distros over the last 10 years and usually try each new release of Ubuntu but have never really cared for it so always end up removing it after a few days. Arch has been serving me extremely well for the last 4 or 5 years so there's been no good reason to change. It's easy to install and maintain, and the default package tool is the best that I've found to date. Everything about Arch seems to just click for me. Of course, it's not a distro intended to satisfy everyone.

    That said, I'm glad there are plenty of distro options available so that more users can find and use what they really like.
    oz

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    I love Ubuntu too, but why there is anything but ubuntu is like asking why there are ice cream flavors other than chocolate, vanilla and strawberry. Baskin Robbins thrives because there are a lot of people who want something different. Could they get by with just 3 flavors of ice cream? Probably, but all the choices at Baskin Robbins gives them the ability to suit their tastes today. So too, all the different flavors of linux give everone the abiltiy to choose what seems best to them and meets their tastes.
    Registered Linux user #526930

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    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
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    Personally I've never cared much about Ubuntu. They've done a great job marketing Linux to newbies, but I think there are other distros out there that do a better job or that suite my needs better. That being said, I do support Ubuntu installations and like Linux Mint very much.

  5. #5
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wcdrotar View Post
    Ubuntu has great stability, perfect for development, very user-friendly, and of course perhaps the best online support base there is. Not trying to start flame wars here, but I think those are pretty well-agreed upon.
    No they are not pretty well-agreed upon ... if you want stability use Debian stable ... Ubuntu is no better suited to development than many other distros ... user-friendly is down to personal preference ... and several other distros have good online support - best is again personal opinion.

    Quote Originally Posted by wcdrotar View Post
    I'm just not seeing what any other Linux distro has that can't be made to work well on Ubuntu one way or another.

    Anyone with me or against me on this one? I'd actually appreciate contrary opinions so I can learn a bit about why y'all like your distros.
    People like to take different approaches, and have different requirements. DSL, Puppy and many other distros will run well on hardware that Ubuntu simply will not run on. I prefer a base system that I add applications and a Window manager to (no desktop environment required - although I have used them in the past) ... I like to use the command line for package updates and system configuration. What about embedded applications?

    Ubuntu may work well for you but that does not mean it works well for everyone. It is very unlikely a single distro will meet everyone's requirements. I'm glad Ubuntu is another choice available to me if I want to use it ...

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    You'll find that a lot of people just don't like Ubuntu. It's the distro that everyone recommends to newbies but don't necessarily want to use themselves.

    Possible reasons:

    1) Ubuntu is big (bloated, some say). Lots of us don't have big computers.
    2) Ubuntu is complex. It's easy to use but not as easy to understand as some other forms of Linux.
    3) Ubuntu does everything for you. It holds your hand with graphical tools that allow you to configure things without really understanding what you are doing. Just like Windows in fact. But you're less likely to learn things that way.
    4) Ubuntu is not all that stable (it's based on the unstable branch of Debian). And the six-monthly update cycle means frequent upgrades and things getting broken or new bugs introduced.

    For some people, especially those using Linux for the first time, the advantages of Ubuntu outweigh the disadvantages. For others the reverse holds true. Horses for courses.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

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    Another angle a couple have touched but didn't write on is where many Linux users do not use Linux as a Windows-replacement or means to gaming or the Internet; those who use Linux in industry environments or embedded systems are likely using it just as a means to control a machine to serve a more specific purpose (be it business or hacking). Especially if you're exploring a new piece of hardware (e.g. porting to the Xbox, a mobile phone, etc), you're not going to be able to just drop Ubuntu in from CD/USB, and even if Ubuntu finds its way to a system (like it has with the Xbox) you'll probably find it tailored for general use "by the masses," not for any particular usage as you would XBMC or Android (...which I'm not completely sure counts as a flavor of Linux so much as an offshoot, but that's irrelevant to this conversation).
    I use Arch because I'm not quite patient enough to compile specific to my hardware (for my desktop and laptops, at least), but I don't want a bunch of extra stuff lying around that I don't use or don't know its purpose, and Arch allows for a quick, minimal setup.

  8. #8
    Just Joined! hunter_thom's Avatar
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    Ubuntu is great for learning linux. Once you learn linux, you realize the things about Ubuntu you do not like. For me, I used Ubuntu a little when I was learning, but not very long. I moved to CentOS for my 'home' computer that my family uses, and ArchLinux for my computer and my servers.

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    Where Ubuntu doesn't play -- older machines

    Ubuntu needs roughly 512M and a 1 ghz CPU.

    There are a flock of distros better suited for machines with lesser resources (eg, older computers).

    Puppy runs down to 128M in the current release and can make old P-III's and P-II's useful.

    DSL goes even lower -- 64M with P-I is enough.

    There are many other criteria for which Ubuntu is either not the first choice or may not work at all, this is but one example.

  10. #10
    Just Joined! PrinceSharma's Avatar
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    One line reply - 'To each his own'.

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