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View Poll Results: Do you run 32-bit Linux, or 64-bit Linux?

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  • 64-bit

    38 56.72%
  • 32-bit

    24 35.82%
  • Other (please specify)

    5 7.46%
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Using 64-bits most of the time. My own andromeda kernel still is 32 bits though. Haven't had the time yet to write a port to 64 bits and it isn't ...
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  1. #21
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    Using 64-bits most of the time. My own andromeda kernel still is 32 bits though. Haven't had the time yet to write a port to 64 bits and it isn't even finished.
    Full time computer science student, spare time OS developer.
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  2. #22
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Mostly 64-bits, though I still have a Ubuntu 9.04 32-bit disc for my laptop that I use occasionally.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #23
    oz
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    According to the poll, we finally have more 64-bit users than we do 32-bit users.

    I'm pretty sure the majority of users were still running 32-bit in the previous thread or poll on this subject. Overall, 64-bit operating systems have taken longer to adopt for Linux and Windows users than I initially thought they would.
    oz

  4. #24
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    i am using 54 bit redhat enterprise linux 6

  5. #25
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tejrajcd View Post
    i am using 54 bit redhat enterprise linux 6
    54 bit... Lost 10 bits there somewhere!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #26
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    Depends on how you look at it, the maximum bus width implemented up until the day of writing this was actually only 48 bits. The 64-bits architecture however allows the addresses to be 64-bits long, but as soon as you try to access a page that isn't reachable within 48 bits, the CPU will trigger a general protection fault.

    So in fact he's got 6 bits too many.

    Also funny to know how 64 bits mode (or long mode) works from the kernel perspective, but that's a little much for a post on the forums, as I would then need to explain things such as paging, PAE, CPU modes and exceptions ...
    Full time computer science student, spare time OS developer.
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  7. #27
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bemk View Post
    Depends on how you look at it, the maximum bus width implemented up until the day of writing this was actually only 48 bits. The 64-bits architecture however allows the addresses to be 64-bits long, but as soon as you try to access a page that isn't reachable within 48 bits, the CPU will trigger a general protection fault.

    So in fact he's got 6 bits too many.

    Also funny to know how 64 bits mode (or long mode) works from the kernel perspective, but that's a little much for a post on the forums, as I would then need to explain things such as paging, PAE, CPU modes and exceptions ...
    Yes, the memory address size is 48-bits as implemented on x86_64 systems, but AFAIK, the instruction set and internal CPU registers are 64-bits in size. Eventually, even the bus width will likely be expanded to allow real 64-bit instructions and memory addresses.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #28
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Yes, the memory address size is 48-bits as implemented on x86_64 systems, but AFAIK, the instruction set and internal CPU registers are 64-bits in size. Eventually, even the bus width will likely be expanded to allow real 64-bit instructions and memory addresses.
    If I am to believe the Intel documents (volume 3a, page 140) the long mode paging system doesn't even support more than 48 bits.

    It indeed is true that every register name preceded with an R is 64-bits in size (and makes the instruction pointer get a funny name: RIP).

    And you might not even realise this, but if you read this document I just pointed at, you'll see that the paging system complexity has been increasing over the years.

    From segment:offset in real mode (allowing up to 1 MiB) to a flat memory model with a 2 tier paging system (Protected Mode or PM), continuing through PAE with a 3 tier model, into an extended architecture supporting 64 bits wide registers, but only addresses up to 48 bits with a 4 tier system.

    So if in IA-32e you want to know the physical address, you must split the virtual address up into 5 parts, 4 of 9 bits and one of 12 bits. With the first part of 9, you take an index in the first table, which points to the next table, which you index with the second part of 9 bits, which points to a 3rd table, and there you use the 3rd part of 9 bits, which point to the actual page table, which you index with the last piece of 9 bits, and that points to the physical page. But we aren't there yet, because we still only have a pointer to 4KiB, and a part of the virtual address the size of 12 bits. Well this is the pointer into the page to get the physical address we wanted.

    (in PM, which is 32 bits mode you only have to go through the last 2 tables and use the index, in PAE, well, let's not talk about that as it's not a clean way of doing things).

    For more info, look at volume 3a of the Intel documentation, and page 118 holds a nice graph of all the possible transitions between modes.

    Oh, and we haven't talked about the segment offset model used even in PM. Good thing that's pretty much removed in IA-32e paging/long mode (yep, by entering IA-32e paging mode you actually enter long mode (that's 64-bits mode if you didn't know)).
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  9. #29
    oz
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    Oddly enough, a higher percentage of users (at the time of this post) were running 64-bit Linux last year (61%), than there are this year (57%), and that's with more total votes already in this year. I'm guessing that might be due to the 64-bit Flash issue that plagued users for so long, but not sure.
    oz

  10. #30
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Well, at least 64-bit flash is working reasonably well now. I'm using it on both my workstation (dual E5450 Xeon chips) and my Dell D630 laptop (dual core Pentium). Both are running 64-bit Scientific Linux (6.0 on workstation, 6.1 on laptop). My only gripe is that I have to shut down my VLC audio streaming in order to hear sound from flash videos. At least it isn't a major impediment, but irritating none-the-less. I think it is due to Chrome/FF/Flash using the ALSA audio sub-system instead of Pulse Audio. The current rendition of ALSA seems to have a bug where you can't have multiple ALSA streams active at the same time. Pulse doesn't have that problem, so I can stream audio, mute it, and still play a video with either VLC or Kaffeine - just not with the flash plugin, though I can run a flash video at the same time if I use VLC to render it. Video is fine - just the audio is a problem.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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