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Thanks to you all. I came across server old laptops and desktops and couldn't load windows on them due to the cost I would have incurred. So I opted to ...
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  1. #11
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    Thanks to you all. I came across server old laptops and desktops and couldn't load windows on them due to the cost I would have incurred. So I opted to install linux, which I wanted to start studying anyway. As I started ordering books on the various flavors of linux, they each came with the installation CDs. So I loaded three different flavors. Debian, Redhat9, RHEL, Ubuntu. I started studying Redhat because at my place of employment, Redhat is the linux of choice. But most of the books wanted me to run and compile a simple program, and that's when the problems started.

  2. #12
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    The 3 different flavors are Debian, Redhat/RHEL, Fedora. Ubuntu I haven't installed yet. In the second sentence that should read several, not server.

  3. #13
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grihm1 View Post
    The 3 different flavors are Debian, Redhat/RHEL, Fedora. Ubuntu I haven't installed yet. In the second sentence that should read several, not server.
    In the interests of furthering your Linux knowledge:

    Ubuntu is a Debian distro.

    Fedora is basically Red Hat's beta/development platform. Fedora 3 was the basis for RHEL 4, Fedora 6 for RHEL 5, and Fedora 12 appears to be the basis for RHEL 6, released in November 2010.

    Red Hat 9 was the basis for RHEL 3, which is in the "Extended Phase" of its lifecycle, which means "obsolete but we might fix something if it's going to make us money or keep us from paying any". You're really wasting your time on this one.

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  5. #14
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    So Red Hat of any version is at the end of its lifecycle? I wonder what the company I work for is using then. I'll have to investigate. I'll shift my focus then to Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu.

  6. #15
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grihm1 View Post
    So Red Hat of any version is at the end of its lifecycle? I wonder what the company I work for is using then. I'll have to investigate. I'll shift my focus then to Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu.
    No, that's not what I said. RHEL 3 is in "extended phase" of support, aka "Extended Life Cycle". Sort of like "life support". Unplug anything and it might be dead.

    Here's Red Hat's official support matrix page:
    https://access.redhat.com/support/po...pdates/errata/

  7. #16
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    Why not try CentOS?

  8. #17
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    Let's not get into a distro flame war.
    What the OP wants is to be able to use gcc to compile programs.

    No matter what distro you are using, the basics are still the same.

    From your query 'which gcc' it appears that gcc is not installed.
    You need to install gcc and it's dependencies.
    In one of the earilier posts. elija gave you the method for installing gcc.
    Do it.

  9. #18
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whych View Post
    Let's not get into a distro flame war.
    What the OP wants is to be able to use gcc to compile programs.
    This is hardly a distro flame war, but I agree we shouldn't start one. I do think that the OP indicated that gcc program compilation was a step on his path to learning about Linux in multiple distributions, so discussing distros was not inappropriate.

    That said, I resolve to leave this thread alone now. I don't like flame wars either.

  10. #19
    Linux Newbie daacosta's Avatar
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    Red Hat Linux has evolved a long way and I wonder which version you have. Stick to one distribution and learn it. There are three types:

    Debian based
    Red Hat based and
    Source based

    For beginners I would try Ubuntu, PCLinuxOS (what I am using right now) or Mint. PCLinuxOS is RPM based (Red Hat) and you should not have any trouble pursuing the exercises on your book (which book is it?)
    -D-

    Registered User # 402675

  11. #20
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    This isn't a flame war; the minute it looks like becoming one I will also bail on the thread. In the meantime. it may be worth reviewing the relationships between the distros talked about. Firstly, in the interest of open-ness, I do prefer the Debian based distros and am in fact a long term Ubuntard, with a tendency to try many alternative distros. I am currently deciding whether to move to Debian testing or LMDE as I am not a fan of Unity. There; complete disclosure ^_^

    In that vein, I'll start with Red Hat.

    RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) is far from dead. In fact version 6 has just been released. CentOS is Red Hat. Minus the branding, minus the support package and minus the financial cost of the support package. It is currently on version 5.5 but version 6 can't be far away. Both of these are stable in both meanings of the word. The software doesn't change and they don't fall over. This stability comes at the cost of being far from the bleeding edge. Fedora is a community distro that I believe is used a testing ground for RHEL. It's about as bleeding edge as you can get, but this comes at a cost of stability. Mostly in the first meaning above and partially in the second.

    Now Debian is another highly stable distro, in both meanings of the word, especially if you install the "stable" version. This is currently 5 but version 6 is in beta. Again, the stability will come with the price of being far, far from the bleeding edge. You can also choose to install Debian testing which changed more often and sometimes breaks. Ubuntu is a distro that is built off Debian testing but it is far from being the same as Debian testing. Canonical, the company that maintain Ubuntu have done a lot of work. Ubuntu can change often and break sometimes, but is considered far friendlier than Debian.

    I hope this is as unbiased as I think it is ^_^
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



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