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I have installed Debian, RedHat9, Fedora14, and will locate another box to install Ubuntu10.10. I'm presently only studying RedHat/Fedora14 and have learned a lot, but I'm not able to compile ...
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  1. #1
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    I'm new to the linux world


    I have installed Debian, RedHat9, Fedora14, and will locate another box to install Ubuntu10.10. I'm presently only studying RedHat/Fedora14 and have learned a lot, but I'm not able to compile the simple programs from the book. Not sure if I have C++ or C. I've created the programs both via vi and cat and have also chmod to 777, still when I run gcc/g++ <program>.c it comes back with file not found.

    I'm methodical so it's hard for me to continue on what figuring out what the problem is. I have moved on, but only to come to another example program that I cannot run. Can you guys advise?

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    The error message for a missing file is "No such file or directory". I suspect from your post that you are getting "Command not found", in which case it is your invocation of gcc that is causing the trouble. Do you actually have gcc installed?

    Try typing "which gcc". This will give the pathname for gcc if it is installed. If not, it will tell you that there is no such name in any of your command path directories.

    If you need to install gcc, it is usually included in a more general package of compilation tools; Ubuntu calls this build-essential; I don't know what Fedora calls it.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
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    I'm new to the linux world

    Well, it appear that I don't have gcc installed. After typing 'which gcc', it plainly states "no gcc in" and then it lists a series of bin and sbin files. Oh well, Fedora14 is the latest version so I assumed it would be there. The RHEL 7 had it and so I thought going to Fedora14 it would have it too. Now I need to try and find a way to install it. Or shift to Debian linux. I started with Redhat because the company I work for uses it. But per the hits I got on the internet, Debian is better.

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    I've never used Fedora, but the old Red Hat used to have three different installation modes: server, desktop and workstation. If you chose "workstation", you got desktop apps plus all the compilation tools; if you chose "desktop", you got apps only. Maybe that's what happened to you.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

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    I'm new to the linux world

    If that's the case, then you have hit on exactly what I did when I installed RHEL7. I figured I have a laptop so I'll install the desktop version. I'll go back and reinstall it to workstation.

    But so far as the Fedora14, I'll just have to either figure it out or wait to see if anyone else may have a suggestion. Like I said, I have about 4 different versions installed, so can rotate from time to time.

    Thank you.

  6. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Can you not just install the compilers and libraries?

    Fedora
    Code:
    su -    
    yum install make automake gcc gcc-c++ kernel-devel
    Seems to be the generally recommended way.

    Debian
    Code:
    su
    apt-get install build-essential
    Ubuntu
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install build-essential
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

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    A suggestion, it might be best to learn just one distro at a time, they each do things a little bit differently.

    RedHat 9 was deprecated in 2003, I'd recommend against its' use.

    Fedora doesn't install gcc by default, new users are encouraged to use the repos.
    Debian isn't really better than Redhat, they would each work well for you.

    Kurt
    Last edited by kurtdriver; 01-05-2011 at 01:53 AM.

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    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    I'd blow away the RH9 install and do Centos 5.5 there instead to learn about mainstream Red Hat. Centos is essentially RH debranded.

    I cordially disagree with kurtdriver on the issue of learning on multiple distros concurrently. I think it will help you develop well-rounded skills, and you'll learn what the distros do the same and what they do differently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by greyhairweenie View Post
    I cordially disagree with kurtdriver on the issue of learning on multiple distros concurrently. I think it will help you develop well-rounded skills, and you'll learn what the distros do the same and what they do differently.
    I'm thinking that for someone new to Linux it could be a tad confusing, having a bunch of learning all at once, but the OP can figure out for himself if that's going to be a problem.
    Exploration is very much recommended.

  10. #10
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kurtdriver View Post
    I'm thinking that for someone new to Linux it could be a tad confusing, having a bunch of learning all at once, but the OP can figure out for himself if that's going to be a problem.
    Exploration is very much recommended.
    We're in agreement there. Having grown up with Red Hat, though, I find myself confused now when I have to troubleshoot, for instance, a Debian install. But no more so than I was originally with Red Hat after all those years of Berkeley and SYSV Unix (which I cut my teeth on concurrently).

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