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Originally Posted by Rubberman FWIW, I use ext2 for file systems that contain mostly large files (videos, etc), and ext3 for those that have a more general mix of files. ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Engineer nujinini's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    FWIW, I use ext2 for file systems that contain mostly large files (videos, etc), and ext3 for those that have a more general mix of files.
    I always thought that ext3 is better than ext4 since its newer and so ext3 is superior to ext2. Now I learn again.

    May I ask why in particular you choose to use ext2 for large files like videos Rubberman? I've tons of em in my external formatted in ext4. Would you suggest I reformat to ext2 for my videos? Might give me some headaches in the future.

    Or should I just leave it as it is since it doesn't give me any problems so far?

    Thanks!

    By the the way, sorry for the cross posting. I feel this info might also be of help to the question of the OP.
    nujinini
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  2. #12
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    ext3 and ext4 (latest & "greatest") are journaling file systems that are supposed to recover better from system crashes. ext2 is the foundation of ext3, the same but without journaling, which is more efficient in cases where you have mostly very large files, which is a good description of video files and dvd images. So, on my discs where I store videos (files mostly > 100mb) I use ext2 simply for efficiency sake. On current systems such as Ubuntu 10.x and RHEL 6 I use ext4. On CentOS/RHEL 5.x I use ext3 for system and normal data drives.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    I love this gparted program

  4. #14
    Linux User zenwalker's Avatar
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    So, rubberman, what are the pros and cons of another non-journalled file system, reiserfs vis-a-vis ext2? I'm curious, now!

  5. #15
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I've run reiser in the past, and found it better performing on the whole. Unfortunatly, the mind and major labor behind that was Reiser himself, who ended up in prison I believe for murdering his wife. Here is the Wikipedia article about that: https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikiped...ki/Hans_Reiser

    So, as a result, it has kind of fallen to the wayside. In many respects, his work was very innovative, advanced, and if he hadn't fallen into this situation it may well have been the preferred advanced file system for today's new Linux systems.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #16
    Linux Engineer nujinini's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by electroman6913 View Post
    I love this gparted program
    Glad to hear that!

    I once helped a friend partition his HD and when he saw how easily I use gparted, his jaw dropped in amazement.

    I word of advise if I may. Once you have started to partition or resize, PLEASE do not stop the process even if it seems to take long. I have lost much data in the past when I cancelled the process because I thought it was a system hang.
    nujinini
    Linux User #489667

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