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Any comments on playonlinux.com? Looking at page, not sure how it differs or improves on wine. I am guessing newer wine version than available in repos, and preinstalled plugins (whatever ...
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  1. #1
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    playonlinux.com


    Any comments on playonlinux.com? Looking at page, not sure how it differs or improves on wine. I am guessing newer wine version than available in repos, and preinstalled plugins (whatever those entail). Maybe it doesn't help regular win programs.

    I am all for any easier and more compatible wine. the compiled binary is 3 versions behind source. We are freakin computer users, administrators, business owners, students, professionals, artists, persons seeking jobs and marketing selves, not developers. I also am too green to know about wine plugins.

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    One improvement...

    I've noticed that play on linux lets you install multiple versions of wine, so that if an upgraded version produces undesirable results, you can always set the application to run on the older version of wine

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    Exclamation My Two Cents

    <disclaimer>The following is just my two cents and should not be taken as advice.</disclaimer>

    I don't use WINE or PlayonLinux. In my opinion, running Windows apps on GNU-Linux (via WINE oe equivalent) is mostly a waste of time and invariably more trouble than it is worth. Most Windows apps can be 'replaced' or substituted by native GNU/ GNOME/ KDE/ X programs that can do pretty much the same (often more, occasionally less) than their Windows counterparts. (If you want something, I suggest that you Google GNU-Linux apps by category/ function to find something. Alternatively, try browsing the FSF's software directory.)

    The exception to GNU-Linux software equivalents is of course the category of serious/ professionally developed games (ProtoType, Far Cry, etc.). This isn't a fault of GNU-Linux, but 'professional' game development studios. Until these guys wake up and jump ship, your best bet for games is dual booting Windows/ Mac OSX and GNU-Linux. At the moment, you're most likely to get games going on Win (and to some extent, OSX).
    Last edited by VirtualLinuxUser; 01-14-2011 at 08:04 AM. Reason: Changing HTML Entities to Plain Text

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    Hi Degarb,
    I have used Playonlinux as well as Wine alone. Personally I like the Playonlinux application. (All respect to those that avoid windows software entirely, but for some it is impractical. That is a different thread.) Playonlinux lets you see ahead of time the games and other applications that are known to work well and allows you to choose the settings that are likely to work. It allows you to choose from different versions of Wine that may work better with different software. You can configure a separate version of Wine to be used with each software title. You can easily simulate a windows reboot. You can set up video and sound preferences as you would in Wine for each program. Personally I like it and think it is very helpful. I think they could do with a better FAQ or more forums activity (Yes, I'm trying to contribute there too )
    Good Gaming,
    Amos

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    Quote Originally Posted by VirtualLinuxUser View Post
    <disclaimer>The following is just my two cents and should not be taken as advice.</disclaimer>

    I don't use WINE or PlayonLinux. In my opinion, running Windows apps on GNU-Linux (via WINE oe equivalent) is mostly a waste of time and invariably more trouble than it is worth. Most Windows apps can be 'replaced' or substituted by native GNU/ GNOME/ KDE/ X programs that can do pretty much the same (often more, occasionally less) than their Windows counterparts. (If you want something, I suggest that you Google GNU-Linux apps by category/ function to find something. Alternatively, try browsing the FSF's software directory.)

    The exception to GNU-Linux software equivalents is of course the category of serious/ professionally developed games (ProtoType, Far Cry, etc.). This isn't a fault of GNU-Linux, but 'professional' game development studios. Until these guys wake up and jump ship, your best bet for games is dual booting Windows/ Mac OSX and GNU-Linux. At the moment, you're most likely to get games going on Win (and to some extent, OSX).
    Yes, I dumped my $400 office program for open office. Using synatic is a no brainer, if something as good is available. Autohotkey, dragon voice recognition, Text (forums,news, ebooks,html) to mp3 voice, for starters. My printer would be nice. Things often just don't work in linux. The more things that work = more users = more linux aps. = snow ball effect! The fewer things that work = less users = less linux aps = less equivalents = slow death by attrition. So wine and play on linux promote linux programs.

    Excellent post Amos, btw.

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