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Hi all, I am looking for my Linux desktop computer in my work's network from a Windows Server on which I do not have an administrator account. I know my ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User Daan's Avatar
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    Question How to find my Linux computer from Windows


    Hi all,

    I am looking for my Linux desktop computer in my work's network from a Windows Server on which I do not have an administrator account. I know my Linux computer's host name, but not it's ip or MAC address. The Linux computer is running several services such as an ssh server, and also an SMB server I think.

    Is there another way to find my Linux computer other than scanning the entire local ip range?

    Thanks,

    Daan
    OS's I use: Debian testing, Debian stable, Ubuntu, OpenSuse 12.1, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP

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    Linux User Daan's Avatar
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    Update: I found my Linux computer in "Network" on the Windows computer, but when I click on it it says that the DNS server cannot find the host name. What I need is it's ip address so that I can login via ssh.
    OS's I use: Debian testing, Debian stable, Ubuntu, OpenSuse 12.1, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    Walk over to the linux box and log onto the console. There you can find the IP address. After that ask your DNS admin to add your host to DNS and then you will be able to connect to it by name.

    Regards
    Robert

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    Linux User Daan's Avatar
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    That is what I would do, but I am not at work. I am connecting to the Windows Server through Remote Desktop from another town. Is there any way to find out my Linux box' ip other than just trying?
    OS's I use: Debian testing, Debian stable, Ubuntu, OpenSuse 12.1, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP

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    how to find your server

    Quote Originally Posted by Daan View Post
    That is what I would do, but I am not at work. I am connecting to the Windows Server through Remote Desktop from another town. Is there any way to find out my Linux box' ip other than just trying?
    First, get a dynamic dns address (dyndns.org).

    Then set your router to route ssh (port 22) to the linux PC's internal address.

    Then you can ssh to the dyndns address and will go right to Linux.

    Internally, forget the name. For windows, I always use the ip address to map a network drive
    \\192.168.1.15\my_sharename

    And you will have to install samba clients and servers on the Linux machine. And also install swat, a web GUI interface for managing samba.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daan View Post
    Update: I found my Linux computer in "Network" on the Windows computer, but when I click on it it says that the DNS server cannot find the host name. What I need is it's ip address so that I can login via ssh.
    If you can see it in network, then it can be found by netbios name. Do you have nbtstat on the windows machine? "nbtstat -c" will show the IP.

    If not, then try something like "net view \\yourcomputer" followed by "netstat" and "netstat -n". Cross reference the source ports to match the name to the IP.

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    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarome View Post
    First, get a dynamic dns address (dyndns.org).

    Then set your router to route ssh (port 22) to the linux PC's internal address.

    Then you can ssh to the dyndns address and will go right to Linux.
    This would work for a home network but not a company network.

    Regards
    Robert

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    This would work for a home network but not a company network.
    I think we can assume there's a valid open path to the Linux host.
    I'd go with the dyndns idea.

  10. #9
    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    To assume there is an open path from the internet to an internal work network would be a mistake. For security reason one would never do this.

    Regards
    Robert

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lazydog View Post
    To assume there is an open path from the internet to an internal work network would be a mistake.
    I was thinking more of this part:

    Quote Originally Posted by Daan View Post
    I found my Linux computer in "Network" on the Windows computer
    In the common case though you would be absolutely right.
    Last edited by Djhg2000; 02-21-2011 at 04:37 AM. Reason: a stupid grammar error

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