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Looking for an on-line Linux+ study system. I want to get my Linux+ but not by just brain-dumping. The 'Net has many companies offering classes and study software. Any suggestion ...
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  1. #1
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    Certification study


    Looking for an on-line Linux+ study system. I want to get my Linux+ but not by just brain-dumping. The 'Net has many companies offering classes and study software. Any suggestion for a reputable one? Working with Linux for about a year but still total Noob. I can get books (on and off line) but prefer a structured learning environment. I have checked out the local Community Colleges but at one class per 8 weeks it will take forever. Thanks.

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    Linux Enthusiast gruven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by druid001 View Post
    Looking for an on-line Linux+ study system. I want to get my Linux+ but not by just brain-dumping. The 'Net has many companies offering classes and study software. Any suggestion for a reputable one? Working with Linux for about a year but still total Noob. I can get books (on and off line) but prefer a structured learning environment. I have checked out the local Community Colleges but at one class per 8 weeks it will take forever. Thanks.
    Honestly, for Linux+ (which I have), all you need is an understanding of RedHat/CentOS, RPM, and a good book. I used the Sybex Linux+ book, read through it a couple times, and took the test. I used Fedora the whole time I studied through it, and the test was not hard after doing that.

    It only took about 3 - 4 weeks of studying the book and Fedora to easily pass the test.

    I have been using Linux for about 16 years though, and took the test about 4 years ago (maybe 5, don't remember).

    Pick up a good book, and use Fedora/CentOS. That is the best study guide I can think of.

    Linux User #376741
    Code is Poetry

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    Thanks, gruven. I'll look at that. I have mostly used Ubuntu\Mint but do have Fedora on an old laptop.

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    Linux+ might have been a joke a few years ago, but now that it's using the LPI exams, I don't think you can just read a book. You have to practice the command line real good.

    They should be passable by someone with real work experience with shell scripting experience.

    I used the Linux Nutshell 3rd edition and some Centos and Slackware VM's. The Roderick book was okay but the questions in it were lame compared to the level on the test.

    I got LPIC-2 just recently. Message me if you have any questions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by yoda9999 View Post
    Linux+ might have been a joke a few years ago, but now that it's using the LPI exams, I don't think you can just read a book. You have to practice the command line real good.

    They should be passable by someone with real work experience with shell scripting experience.

    I used the Linux Nutshell 3rd edition and some Centos and Slackware VM's. The Roderick book was okay but the questions in it were lame compared to the level on the test.

    I got LPIC-2 just recently. Message me if you have any questions.
    Thanks for the advice and help. I'm mostly a gui-baby so its going to be... challenging.

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    Just Joined! hunter_thom's Avatar
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    I think LPI is great, for two major reasons:

    1. The requirements are vague and broad. This leads to over-study, which is wonderful in my opinion. I have an LPIC-2, and am a Linux Systems Administrator. A broad set of knowledge is key in administration.
    2. Distribution agnosticism. You are Linux, not Red Hat or SUSE or Debian. This is also key, because you are gaining strong fundamental knowledge. With this you can comfortably move from distribution to distribution.

    A lot depends on what you want to do, though. As an admin, I like to see LPI certified individuals, but it is also nice seeing RHCSA/RHCE/RHCT because this shows a more practical knowledge set (we are a RHEL shop). But Red Hat exams are expensive and training is a fortune. Therefore: unless you are very seriously wanting to be a Linux Sysadmin, I would not suggest taking the Red Hat track.

    My suggestion in either case would be to secure an LPIC-2. This is relatively inexpensive, you gain a very strong skill set, and it is well recognized. If you can get an LPIC-2, you are more than capable of getting vendor-specific certs, IMHO.

    My $0.02.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter_thom View Post
    I think LPI is great, for two major reasons:

    1. The requirements are vague and broad. This leads to over-study, which is wonderful in my opinion. I have an LPIC-2, and am a Linux Systems Administrator. A broad set of knowledge is key in administration.
    2. Distribution agnosticism. You are Linux, not Red Hat or SUSE or Debian. This is also key, because you are gaining strong fundamental knowledge. With this you can comfortably move from distribution to distribution.

    A lot depends on what you want to do, though. As an admin, I like to see LPI certified individuals, but it is also nice seeing RHCSA/RHCE/RHCT because this shows a more practical knowledge set (we are a RHEL shop). But Red Hat exams are expensive and training is a fortune. Therefore: unless you are very seriously wanting to be a Linux Sysadmin, I would not suggest taking the Red Hat track.

    My suggestion in either case would be to secure an LPIC-2. This is relatively inexpensive, you gain a very strong skill set, and it is well recognized. If you can get an LPIC-2, you are more than capable of getting vendor-specific certs, IMHO.

    My $0.02.
    Thanks for the encouraging advice, I think that's what I'll pursue.

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