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Originally Posted by rokytnji From what I see. This Distro has a small team and base. As do a lot of Linux distros. Unfair to compare to a billion dollar ...
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
    From what I see. This Distro has a small team and base. As do a lot of Linux distros. Unfair to compare to a billion dollar corp.

    Easy to do documentation when you have a billion dollars to pay for documentation. Which takes months,hardware,testers,manpower to do.

    I Belong to a small distro organization. We have 1 to 2 guys who do all the heavy lifting. Not a dept building staffed with troops.



    Now don't take offence. Just trying to enlighten you to FOSS way of thinking.
    Developers welcome,testers, script writers,users, and free help of any sort.
    You are probably welcome to write the above documentation your self and submit it to the developer for perusal and critiq. I know. I have written how to's for the distro of my choice and am mentioned on the main page.

    Documentation is a thankless labor of love.

    Even Ubuntu uses User Documentation (Canonical has the bucks). So hope you don't get exasperated jumping through hoops and understand a little better about a distros resources (given out of love, not profit). Takes time and effort to make a distro, put up a website,make a forum.work out the bugs, and write the documentation you request.

    That is where folks like us come in.

    Happy Trails, Rok
    I undertand you cannot compete with Billy Gateswalker (aka DarthDastard) & his Evil (microsoft) Empire. But if you're saying you cannot compete with eComStation, Haiku, etc., well then you're really 'up the creek'. Proper hardware documentation should be the first priority. Without it new users must take potluck, and if they end up with a empty pot and no luck...you maybe just lost one. I heard all the time about Linux and BSD being to difficult for beginners to even try. Not having basic hardware info just plays into that propaganda. It should not be that difficult to put out a survey among current users asking details of what hardware they are using (if you have forum). Even lackluster response would be better than what is currently available. My biggest surprise is a few of the smaller Linux distros have more detailed hardware info than large ones like my intended (Linux Mint)! I know you can only do so much, but it appears like hardware info is at the bottom of the totem pole....

  2. #12
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faileas View Post
    I undertand you cannot compete with Billy Gateswalker (aka DarthDastard) & his Evil (microsoft) Empire. But if you're saying you cannot compete with eComStation, Haiku, etc., well then you're really 'up the creek'. Proper hardware documentation should be the first priority. Without it new users must take potluck, and if they end up with a empty pot and no luck...you maybe just lost one. I heard all the time about Linux and BSD being to difficult for beginners to even try. Not having basic hardware info just plays into that propaganda. It should not be that difficult to put out a survey among current users asking details of what hardware they are using (if you have forum). Even lackluster response would be better than what is currently available. My biggest surprise is a few of the smaller Linux distros have more detailed hardware info than large ones like my intended (Linux Mint)! I know you can only do so much, but it appears like hardware info is at the bottom of the totem pole....
    It's a matter of priorities. It is better to have something that works and poorly documented than something broken but with beautiful and complete documentation.

    Haiku, your example of another OS has been in progress for many years; it was at least three or four years ago that I looked at it and it has only just recently reached alpha. That's with a much bigger team. Syllable also suffers from the same and again that's with a bigger team. In the case of Syllable, I don't think it's much bigger.

    When a project is new, beginners are probably not the target market. It's the tinkerers and madmen. At this stage, if you don't know what the hardware requirements are, then install it on the smallest thing you can to find out and then come on fora like this to brag about it
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    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
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    @ Faileas, Have you ever given This a go. It is a time saver for me.

    It checks what hardware and what drivers are used on any live cd you boot up that is based on Debian. Aw Heck. Here is the link again in case anybody else is reading this.

    Debian HCL; Debian GNU/Linux device driver check & report

    Makes a good Bookmark.
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    Fortress Linux' stability is very good (Even the Alpha version), though it's impossible to make a bleeding edge/advanced OS extremely stable like other Linux OS' that are still somewhere in the middle-ages like Debian and any *BSD* OS.

    In short, Fortress Linux will be stable in 95% of the cases when it reaches Beta.

    Fortress Linux supports almost everything that the kernel has to offer and the "Fortress Linux System Wizard" detects 99% of all the supported hardware that exists today (The FLSW will be included in the beta version due to lack of time/financial support.)

    By querying our database with your computers' hardware setup, it customizes your kernel to fit exactly your computer hardware. It can also automatically configure your xorg.conf, module settings, kernel command-line options, alsa settings, ACPI settings and install/update proprietary software with just a click of a mouse (when the system configuration in question has been added to the database and tested before).

    For example, the FLSW detects my Panasonic Toughbook and it pulls in all the required and tested settings, modules etc for this laptop. Just reboot after configuring and everything works like a charm.. without any bloat.

    Currently, I'm delivering customized versions of Fortress Linux to high-profile companies. These orders take precedence over the free version of Fortress Linux and the website since I have mouths to feed too.

    I'm hoping to hire my own IT army a.s.a.p since I cannot rely on grumpy, anti-social, ignorant, short-sighted Linux nerds that promise to fix their software bugs and exploits when pigs fly (the kernel team for example).

    If you want to do it right, you have do it yourself. Linux will never win without an independent and commercial backbone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    It's a matter of priorities. It is better to have something that works and poorly documented than something broken but with beautiful and complete documentation.

    Haiku, your example of another OS has been in progress for many years; it was at least three or four years ago that I looked at it and it has only just recently reached alpha. That's with a much bigger team. Syllable also suffers from the same and again that's with a bigger team. In the case of Syllable, I don't think it's much bigger.

    When a project is new, beginners are probably not the target market. It's the tinkerers and madmen. At this stage, if you don't know what the hardware requirements are, then install it on the smallest thing you can to find out and then come on fora like this to brag about it
    Having re-read entire thread it seems I failed to make clear my intent. Firstly, my post (#9) was intended to answer Palatinux's statement "it's difficult to determine what to tell". As I've yet to hear anyone complain about too much hardware info, my advice was to make that a priority.

    That said, my criticism about "the Star spangled Banner" was not aimed at Fortress Linux. From its lack of presence on Distrowatch site (plus other clues), I am aware its one of the 'new kids on the block'. My criticism was for those well-established distros, such as Linux Mint and Ubuntu (two I'm interested in), that are well represented on sites like Distrowatch, and have put out loads of (what I would call trivial) info I do not need to know...while the hardware data I do require is either lacking...or well hidden!

    And yet I was able to find enough hardware info from Haiku, Syllable, eComStation, & MenuetOS, sites to have designed a PC that would of run any of these operating systems at optimal rate...if I wanted a stone-age PC that is. And I was able to find that detailed info in a few days. I've been trying to do this with Linux Mint and PC-BSD for 3 or 4 weeks now, with only minimal success. Yes, I do agree its "a matter of priorities." I can only hope that Fortress Linux decides not to follow the established distros in placing hardware info into the 'afterthought' category!

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    Hi Faileas,

    A month ago, there where three files available on the Fortress Linux website (20mb in total) containing the supported kernel options, supported modules, supported PCI and USB devices in the Fortress Linux kernel. These will be back online when Fortress Linux is declared stable.

    We are listed on distrowatch in the waiting section, but the only way to get to the "normal" list is by paying distrowatch $200 for an advertisement space on their website. And if you pay enough, you will get in the top 10 of the list. Yes, distrowatch is only interested in filling their pockets.

    About that thing with stars and stripes, I'm not offended in any way if you're worried about that though we Dutch think the same way about the US as most Canadians and Britons do.

    The US goverment is the main reason why I started Fortress Linux. They even tried to bribe me last year (which I refused) to quit on FL. And now they are spooking my voluteers and they have uploaded fake ISO images of Fortress Linux (just check the seeders IP range when its online)

    We even get heavy DDoS attacks from China and scriptkiddies from Russia, but nothing will prevent Fortress Linux from giving the digital privacy and freedom back to the people
    Last edited by MikeTbob; 04-12-2011 at 04:44 AM. Reason: Read the forum rules

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