Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 37
Like Tree1Likes
I dual-booted windows 7 with fedora 15. Kind of struggling to understand linux, any tips?...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined! davidgov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ourém, Santarém, PT
    Posts
    10

    Hi, i'm a Linux noob coming from windows! Any tips?


    I dual-booted windows 7 with fedora 15. Kind of struggling to understand linux, any tips?
    KarenV likes this.

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Munich
    Posts
    3,221
    Here is a nice side-by-side comparison
    Comparison of Windows and Linux - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    In short, Linux is NOT Windows
    but you probably know that already

    What area are you struggling with?
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

  3. #3
    Just Joined! davidgov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ourém, Santarém, PT
    Posts
    10
    Well, the install/unistall process is tricky ( if you don't mind take a look at my post in the fedora section abou the flash player), but you know I'm the usual guy that has Windows and dominates it, thus thinking that he is the king of the world, then hears that linux is better for programming (still a noob, only know a bit of python) and decides to try it out, only to realize that he sucks...
    So, yeah, that is pretty much my situation.

  4. #4
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Munich
    Posts
    3,221
    Hope my answer there will help you.

    About install being tricky.
    Yes and no.

    In fedora, software is packaged in RPMs.
    RPMs are collected in repositories, suited for your linux distribution and version.

    Your package manager yum knows about the standard fedora repositories.
    Any software there is available via a trivial
    Code:
    yum install <applicationname>
    and searched via
    yum search whatever
    The fedora repos contain only free packages.
    Flash is not free.

    However, it is possible to add 3rd_party repositories to your system.
    Such as the one for flash here
    The Perfect Desktop - Fedora 15 i686 (GNOME) - Page 3 | HowtoForge - Linux Howtos and Tutorials

    And once this is added, yum can find and install it.


    So, for anything available via repos:
    Installation is very simple and has the benefits, that all files are managed and updated by *one process*

    Admitted, it does get harder if a software is not available in repos.
    For the start, I would recommend to stay within the repo boundaries.

    Sooner or later, you will probably have to compile and install from source and/or package your own software.
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

  5. #5
    Just Joined! davidgov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ourém, Santarém, PT
    Posts
    10
    Thanks, btw what do you think of my english (im portuguese)?

  6. #6
    Trusted Penguin Irithori's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Munich
    Posts
    3,221
    Your english is good and understandable, but I´m not a native speaker either
    You must always face the curtain with a bow.

  7. #7
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Saint Paul, MN
    Posts
    581
    Quote Originally Posted by davidgov View Post
    I dual-booted windows 7 with fedora 15. Kind of struggling to understand linux, any tips?
    For help on adding stuff such as DVD playing, mp3 playing, etc see the "Unofficial Fedora FAs" at The Unofficial FedoraŽ FAQ (I believe that the most recent version there is 14 rather than 15 but a lot of it is the same version after version.

  8. #8
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    12
    I'm not a Fedora user myself (using Ubuntu and it's variants for about 2 years now), but I can add this for the things you may have to compile yourself. Most of the applications will have either a "README.LINUX" or "INSTALL" file included in them (these are text files, so they should open in Gedit or your text editor of choice). Follow their instructions for making/compiling/installing the application, and you should be fine. Essentially it will consist of command line (terminal) commands like

    tar -xzvf filenameThatYouDownloaded
    cd filenameThatYouDownloaded (you can simplify it by typing cd and the first few letters of the filename with a * after it).
    ./configure ***This will either work successfully, or error out. If it errors out, you probably need to use yum to install dependencies (needed files and libraries to make it work).
    make (this actually makes the installer for you)
    make install (Linux equivalent of running the setup.exe file in Windows)

    **** Note that most of these (especially the make install) need to be done as su (root) or using sudo (if someone from an ubuntu-based system is reading this). Personally I use su/sudo for all of the make commands.

    If you want to remove the application, you'll need to cd back into this folder/directory, and use

    make uninstall

    It'll probably need to be ran as root (if you had to run make install as root, you'll have to run make uninstall as root also).

    Something else to be noted is this. If you want to use it only for yourself, you don't normally need to run the installer as root. However, if it is to be used by any user ("Install for All Users" from Windows), it needs to be ran as root (su). If you try to run the installer as yourself, and it tries to install in a protected area, it will tell you that you need to be root (or will ask you for another location in your home folder or /usr folder most likely).

    Control key + C key will be your friend in the command line. If you get stuck in something, use that combination to escape out of it. If it doesn't work, then simply close the Terminal window. (The usual warning that this could corrupt your system applies).

    Also, you could possibly find one of the "Linux for Dummies" books (a stupid way of saying "Linux in Laymen's Terms"). I've used them myself, and highly recommend them (and I've been using computers since 1978 ).

    Hope this helps, and have a great day
    Patrick.
    Last edited by PatrickDickey52761; 08-16-2011 at 12:46 AM. Reason: fixing an emoticon that shouldn't be...

  9. #9
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Cambridge, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    24

    Misc. Pointers

    Here are what I think are foundational keys to GNU/Linux (Fedora included).

    - Don't ignore the command line (bash). Some capabilities of your system have no graphical control, requiring bash.
    - Only run a command in bash if you are 100% sure that you can't ruin your system. GNU/Linux does not have the forgiveness of Windows
    - Most commands and configuration files have manuals on them. Typing "man foo-bar" or, with some commands, "foo-bar --help" will give you a summary. "info foo-bar" will give more details to beginners
    - Use the convenience . Anything to be done on a regular basis (i.e. boot-time) can be scripted. In Fedora, the file is /etc/rc.local by default. Anything you write there will be done after all other boot programs by the root user. See "man /etc/rc.local" for that description.
    - Security, privacy, stability, and trust in your operating system can be improved by avoiding proprietary parts. See Local Shared Object - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia for more. Here's a nifty solution to some of your possible needs: youtube-dl
    a simple "su -c 'yum install youtube-dl'" should do this for you.
    - One final point... I highly recommend RPMFusion's repository of software. Good multimedia stuff can be found there and not in the standard Fedora repositories: Configuration - RPM Fusion

    Best wishes to you in your use of GNU/Linux.

  10. #10
    Just Joined! spaceminer143's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    20

    Welcome to Linux!

    I made the transition from Windows to Linux about 4 years ago and it was not in any way easy for me, but it was worth it. I learned so much about the guts of computers and programming (Of course, I had to be the guy who jumped straight into Slackware...). My advice is stick with it, and dual booting is a very good thing (at least) until you're more comfortable.

    PS: I am a native English speaker and I think you have better English than most people who can make that claim.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •