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Hello All, This is my first post here! I am an experienced Linux/Unix admin, i would like to get into C prgramming in linux, Purely from a job market point ...
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  1. #1
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    Get into C programming


    Hello All,

    This is my first post here!

    I am an experienced Linux/Unix admin, i would like to get into C prgramming in linux, Purely from a job market point of view, would you say it would be a good move to move from a support role to a programming role?

  2. #2
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    It would be a great move.
    Unfortunately, it is not always an easy one, as people have particular superstition about you as an IT person. You cannot start a fresh page in your career.
    But it is worth at least trying.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    As a software developer, I of course think it's a great idea .

    One thing to be aware of, however, is that C is not quite as common as once it was. Although there are many jobs that still work at such a low level, application development has moved into the more Java realm (though C++ is still around), and web development is quite popular now, which tends to use languages like Perl, Ruby, etc.

    However, many concepts that you will learn by learning C do carry to all sorts of other languages, and since many modern languages are based in part on C, it's not a bad language to learn.

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    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    RE: would be a good move to move from a support role to a programming

    This is a very personal decision and nobody can give you an advice on that.
    If you want to make money with software the closer you are to the clients (and to the Government Projects) the better. The programmers are not the people that are closest to these. Unfortunately the system administrator isn't that close as well. You may switch over to Project Manager.

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    If you'd like to learn the C Language get the Denis Ritchie book it's really well explained.


    Quote Originally Posted by mpdevul View Post
    Hello All,

    This is my first post here!

    I am an experienced Linux/Unix admin, i would like to get into C prgramming in linux, Purely from a job market point of view, would you say it would be a good move to move from a support role to a programming role?

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    Hi All,

    Thank you all for your replies.

  8. #7
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Well, C is still required for Linux kernel and driver development. In any case, my first suggestion to new programmers is to first learn to "think objectively" - learn how to break a problem space into discrete parts and model their behaviors, relationships, and interactions. UML is great for doing this. Then select a language to map the model into. These days, I prefer C++, though there are other languages that support the notion of classes/methods/relationships (all the object oriented cruft) well, such as Java. It took me about 2 years to go from a very competent C programmer to being good with C++, but I was doing object oriented programming in C, even though I didn't know it was called that! It just seemed natural and correct to me, and resulted in very efficient and robust programs that had a high order of complexity. Some of that "object-oriented" C software which I wrote over 20 years ago is still used to run factories and US Navy repair facilities to this day, with no bugs reported.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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