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The desktops are separate from the OS? I am not sure what this means. I have a feeling it might not mean quite the same thing in Linux as it ...
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  1. #11
    Just Joined! WhitePhoenix's Avatar
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    The desktops are separate from the OS? I am not sure what this means. I have a feeling it might not mean quite the same thing in Linux as it does in Windows.

  2. #12
    oz
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhitePhoenix View Post
    The desktops are separate from the OS? I am not sure what this means.
    Hello and welcome!

    Yes, a desktop environment is different from the distribution itself. You can find a nice listing and information on different desktop environments and window managers here:

    Window Managers for X

    Also, check the following links for additional info on them:

    Window manager - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Desktop environment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    oz

  3. #13
    Just Joined! WhitePhoenix's Avatar
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    Then the windows manager and desktop environment sounds like what would be involved in creating desktop themes for the Linux systems. Maybe even more flexible than in Windows. Hopefully as easy as Windows ME.

    A friend on Facebook reminded me that with the new laptop I could easily have a dual-boot system using Windows until I was comfortable with Linux.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    I agree with your friend. You should go for dual boot only. Its really easy to setup dual boot. Install other OS first. Create free space for Linux and install Linux in it. Linux installer will detect other OS and setup dual boot itself. You won't have to anything special for Dual Boot setup.
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    Install other OS first. Create free space for Linux and install Linux in it. Linux installer will detect other OS and setup dual boot itself. You won't have to anything special for Dual Boot setup.
    Wouldn’t I have to partition the hard drive first then install Windows 7 in one and Linux in the other?

  6. #16
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    It's been a long time since I dual booted, but even then if I recall correctly, the Linux installer usually did that for you. However, I remember reading somewhere that Windows 7 splats files all over the disk making it more difficult, so it couldn't hurt to create the partitions first if you are comfortable doing that.
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  7. #17
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhitePhoenix
    Wouldn’t I have to partition the hard drive first then install Windows 7 in one and Linux in the other?
    Installers of all Windows OS versions give an option to create partition structure before starting installation. You can create a separate partition for Linux before installing Windows OS.

    You can create new partition for Linux after Windows OS installation too. You can use Windows Disk Management Tool to create new partition(s).
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  8. #18
    Just Joined! WhitePhoenix's Avatar
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    No. Not all Windows versions.

    I found this on the web:
    Recent operating systems like Windows 7 and also Windows Vista has a great dexterity in them that the Hard Disk can be partitioned, re-sized without formatting your computer.

    Up until Vista, if you wanted to partition a disk, you had to re-format and then create the new partition. This erases all files on the disk in both partitions. Disk management in XP did not include partitioning on the fly like this. This feature was introduced when Vista was released.

  9. #19
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Which version of Windows OS are you planning to install?
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  10. #20
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    Windows 7. Since I went right from XP to W7, I didn’t know about the improvements in disk partitioning. But now that I understand, it will be easier to create a dual-boot now.

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