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Disk Management Tool of Windows 7 works much better than other versions of Windows OS. You can manage partitions with it easily....
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  1. #21
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    Disk Management Tool of Windows 7 works much better than other versions of Windows OS. You can manage partitions with it easily.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  2. #22
    Just Joined! WhitePhoenix's Avatar
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    Yes, but continually having to get permission, even though I am the only one on the system and therefore the administrator by default, for just about everything while installing my programs and customizing is a hemorrhoid. I never had this much problem with earlier Windows versions, not even XP. Being careful is wise, but this is paranoia.

  3. #23
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    That's the thing... on a Linux system you're not the admin by default.
    From a security stand-point you're a user.
    Jay

    New users, read this first.
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    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help. Please keep it on the public boards.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhitePhoenix View Post
    Yes, but continually having to get permission, even though I am the only one on the system and therefore the administrator by default, for just about everything while installing my programs and customizing is a hemorrhoid. I never had this much problem with earlier Windows versions, not even XP. Being careful is wise, but this is paranoia.
    If you were annoyed by the UAC, etc in Windows Vista/7 then you could have just turned it off...

    If you disliked the "paranoia" in Vista/7 then switching to GNU/Linux is going to be even more of a headache for you, because as jayd512 says the user is not the admin. This means lots of perceived restrictions from a noob's point of view and a totally different mode of working for you to get used to.

  5. #25
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    I reccomend people look into the new Commodore OS Vision! Its only in the beta phase and will be free but will also be shipped with the new Commodore 64 computers. Its pretty kool, really unique theme, and is based of Mint & Debian (most likely mint debian) with Gnome 2.30, the only problem i had with it was video card drivers.

    It has some propriety software i noticed when trying it out, such as libreoffice comes with Arial, Times New Roman, and couple of other microsoft propriety fonts.

    @WhitePhoenix: Its not paranoia, its actually really sensible, when your the superusr you can do absolutely anything to the system! Delete important OS files or change unknown settings! Not only that but by being the superuser anybody who manages to get remote access can also have those privelages, which means setting up a trojan, virus or worm is just made that much easier for them, not to mention they can block you out of your computer (i.e. change root password and user/s passwords).
    If your running as a user with the ability to become a superuser, it means that a malicous body who wants access will only be able to get into the user account, thus they can't install trojans or any malicous software UNTIL they gain access to the superuser!

    Microsoft realised this and thats why in Windows 7 they have automatically set it up as default, that to change system settings your are required permission from the "superuser" (Admin).

    My advice to you is, learn terminal and the command "sudo" or "su"
    Last edited by SL6-A1000; 11-16-2011 at 03:34 AM.

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