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For beginners... I just installed Centos 6 and want to learn Linux in general, but in the end have a "small", text based (no GUI) server (PHP, MySQL etc...). I ...
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  1. #1
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    What are the good books about Linux?


    For beginners... I just installed Centos 6 and want to learn Linux in general, but in the end have a "small", text based (no GUI) server (PHP, MySQL etc...).

    I looked at "Linux all-in-one for dummies" and "Practical guide to Linux, 2nd edition", but none of them seem to be easy to read.

    There are books out there on difficult topics that are easy to read and some on topic that are easy that are hard to go through if you know what I mean...

    Thanks in advance for any info.

  2. #2
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    This was brought up a little while back, too.
    So instead of me copying the answers...
    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/cof...als-books.html
    Jay

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  3. #3
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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  4. #4
    Linux User Krendoshazin's Avatar
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    I think you should take a look at RUTE. It's a pretty extensive book that covers and lot of subjects, and it's available for free online. Even if you're a beginner, this book starts somewhat from the ground up and so you should find it educational: http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz

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    Cool

    open a terminal and type "help" and then "info" each command that shows up in the list... and read

    "info" is "man" (unix program manuals) beefed up on roids (or markup, rather), which when used by itself also provides manuals on lots of topics & programs and libraries. With "info" you can scroll to the corresponding asterisk and 'enter' to pursue the link all from the command line (try "info info" to read its tutorial). though what would be the most beneficial is to read "info bash", "info grep", "info sed", "info less" and "info ls" to get started with the basics (and be ahead of most, as people tend to shy away from the obvious: reading the manual!!)...

    Since nearly all GNU/Linux systems have the packages 'coreutils', 'diffutils' and other fundamental GNU programs, most other programs build on that core functionality. What separates distributions such as CentOS (from Ubuntu or Fedora or Debian or ArchLinux, etc. ad nausea o.O) is simply the way packages are tweaked/compiled, arranged, managed and handled for that distro. Everything else is lagniappe!

    If you Must get a book (and by all means soak up all you can from where you can), why not either the CentOS or Linux Bible (both should be on the shelf at a major bookstore)? Either should provide enough to get started with GNU/Linux in general, and contain common practice models from acquisition and installation of a system distro, to core/basic administration topics that span an information range by way of necessity to manage your own system. ... ...That is if you get tired of "info" (not that you would get tired of the plethora of information provided by "info") Though FREE resources are even better, as previously mention

    Hope this helps!

  6. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krendoshazin View Post
    I think you should take a look at RUTE. It's a pretty extensive book that covers and lot of subjects, and it's available for free online. Even if you're a beginner, this book starts somewhat from the ground up and so you should find it educational: http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
    Looks like a good read. Bookmarked for future reference
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