Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 8 of 8
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By masinick
Hi what is the difference between mint & fedora regarding installation of apps? fedora support rpm? (its click & play installation?) & mint? it support .deb files or what? thanks...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    14

    what is the difference?


    Hi
    what is the difference between mint & fedora regarding installation of apps?
    fedora support rpm? (its click & play installation?)
    & mint? it support .deb files or what?
    thanks

  2. #2
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    5,023
    Linux doesn't really have what you would call 'click and play' installation.
    So the main differences you'll notice are going to be with the package managers.
    These handle all the grunt work of installing the applications, as well as any dependency programs that may be required.
    Thankfully, they are very easy to deal with.
    Software can be installed like so...
    Fedora:
    Code:
    yum install frozen-bubble
    Mint:
    Code:
    apt-get install frozen-bubble
    Both need root permission to install software, so use su or sudo accordingly.
    Last edited by jayd512; 11-28-2011 at 12:49 AM. Reason: spelling
    Jay

    New users, read this first.
    New Member FAQ
    Registered Linux User #463940
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help. Please keep it on the public boards.

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Clinton Township, MI
    Posts
    104
    Fedora uses RPM-based packages; Mint uses DEB-based packages. Fedora emphasizes only free software in its repositories, You have to extend it yourself if you want to use binary programs that do not include free source code. Mint is more pragmatic, and offers a user experience that is easier and more convenient for a beginner to grasp. Fedora emphasizes security and development tools. Mint emphasizes user applications.

    Both are very good, but they emphasize very different things. You can, if you want to put the work into it yourself, get similar things out of either system, but as they are packaged, Fedora is a better development and security platform, and Mint is a better consumer application user platform.
    Roxoff likes this.
    Brian Masinick
    masinick AT yahoo DOT com

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Trusted Penguin
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    4,353
    To add to the good answers already given, it is also worth mentioning that both Red Hat derivatives (Fedora et al) and Debian derivatives (Ubuntu/Mint et al) have a graphical user interface that users new to Linux find easier to use than the command line versions. You can't beat the command line versions for getting down and dirty, though - not to mention trouble-shooting.

  6. #5
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    664
    Adding just a bit more, for stuff that's not in the Fedora repos, add the RPMFusion repositories (free and non-free). Google RPMFusion and you'll find instructions. The non-free repo has the proprietary binary stuff that can make life easier, like support for certain wireless cards.

  7. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Fairfax, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    94
    Hi, I use Fedora at home and Ubuntu at work. One more difference worth pointing out is that RedHat (Fedora) based systems are modelled after standard Unix. Debian and Ubuntu changed a lot of standard Unix conventions. For instance, the boot process and files contributing to the boot process are different in Ubuntu than standard Unix. Ubuntu or Debian evidently decided to do things differently. Normally this would be a big deal, but Ubuntu is so popular that they are redefining Unix.

    My personal preference is Fedora because I treasure bash, awk and my configuration scripts being configured how I expect them but I'd recommend Ubuntu to someone new strictly based on its popularity.

    I'm not tuned into the politics of Linux, but the nearest I can tell is the general population got quite upset with the RPM command a few years ago. Things used to be really difficult and it was almost impossible to use Linux as a desktop machine at home (I ran Windows back then). The next thing I knew, Ubuntu showed up and changed all of that ... all of the sudden I was able to just install Nvidea drivers right from the command line. Since that period, "yum" has really come a long way but people didn't forget.

  8. #7
    Trusted Penguin
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    4,353
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMicek View Post
    Hi, I use Fedora at home and Ubuntu at work. One more difference worth pointing out is that RedHat (Fedora) based systems are modelled after standard Unix. Debian and Ubuntu changed a lot of standard Unix conventions. For instance, the boot process and files contributing to the boot process are different in Ubuntu than standard Unix. Ubuntu or Debian evidently decided to do things differently. Normally this would be a big deal, but Ubuntu is so popular that they are redefining Unix.

    My personal preference is Fedora because I treasure bash, awk and my configuration scripts being configured how I expect them but I'd recommend Ubuntu to someone new strictly based on its popularity.
    This issue annoyed me (Fedora and Ubuntu booting differently) and kept me away from Ubuntu for a while. But then Fedora jumped on the bandwagon and started using Ubuntu's upstart init daemon ( as early as Fedora 9?) but kept honoring the original SysVinit scripts, so people may not have even noticed, if they didn't read the changelog. Now Fedora has ditched upstart in favor of systemd. I guess basically I have learned to be more flexible...

  9. #8
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Fairfax, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    94
    Yea, your right and I agree. Systemd is not something I have fun debugging. The whole initrd Dracat thing is also something that I could do without also ... they tried to replace mkinitrd with dracut and life never blended as well as they hoped.

    What keeps me going is that overall Linux is improving at a really rapid rate.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •