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I am wondering are spelling and pronunciation linked in anyway. I.E if a person can pronunciation words/speak words very well. Will he necessarily be able to spell words very well. ...
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  1. #1
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    spelling and pronunciation ?


    I am wondering are spelling and pronunciation linked in anyway.
    I.E if a person can pronunciation words/speak words very well. Will he necessarily be able to spell words very well.

    And visa-versa. Is their any correlation.

    I am mainly concerned with the English language but I am also wondering if it is true for more languages in general.

  2. #2
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Not much correlation in English

    1) The bandage was wound around the wound.
    2) The farm was used to produce produce.
    3) The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.
    4) We must polish the Polish furniture.
    5) He could lead if he would get the lead out.
    6) The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert.
    7) Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present.
    8 ) A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.
    9) When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.
    10) I did not object to the object.
    11) The insurance was invalid for the invalid.
    12) There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row.
    13) They were too close to the door to close it.
    14) The buck does funny things when the does are present.
    15) A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.
    16) To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow.
    17) The wind was too strong to wind the sail.
    18 ) After a number of injections my jaw got number.
    19) Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear.
    20) I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.
    21) How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?

    Let's face it - English is a crazy language. There is no egg in eggplant nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor pine in pineapple. English muffins weren't invented in England or French fries in France.

    Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads, which aren't sweet, are meat. We take English for granted. But if we explore its paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

    And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing, grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham? If the plural of tooth is teeth, why isn't the plural of booth beeth? One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese? One index, 2 indices?

    Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend. If you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

    If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught? If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat?

    Sometimes I think all the English speakers should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane. In what language do people:
    Recite at a play and play at a recital?
    Ship by truck and send cargo by ship?
    Have noses that run and feet that smell?

    How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?

    You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language in which your house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by filling it out and in which, an alarm goes off by going on.

    English was invented by people, not computers, and it reflects the creativity of the human race, which, of course, is not a race at all. That is why, when the stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out, they are invisible.
    PS: Why doesn't "buick" rhyme with "quick"?
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


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    Nice, elija that was cool or hot however you want to put it .

    My main purpose is to get better at spelling and pronunciation English words.
    Is their any faster/better way to get good at spelling other then brute force writing and speaking the word a million times until it is memorized ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sam111 View Post
    Nice, elija that was cool or hot however you want to put it .

    My main purpose is to get better at spelling and pronunciation English words.
    Is their any faster/better way to get good at spelling other then brute force writing and speaking the word a million times until it is memorized ?
    watch American television (I can't believe I just said that)

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    That must be a joke

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    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atreyu View Post
    watch American television (I can't believe I just said that)
    Just don't watch Jersey Shore, or anything labeled 'Real Housewives of...".
    Seriously, though, being an avid reader or writer helps.
    If you decide to learn from American TV or film, go for documentaries. They seem to butcher the language the least.
    Jay

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  7. #7
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Here's another for your list, Elija. In Linux, you start a program by executing it and stop it by killing it.

    Seriously, if you want to understand English spelling, you must study German spelling first. For example, wherever German has a ch, English will have a gh. It may be silent (nacht, night) or pronounced like an F (lachen laugh) but it will be there. Similarly the silent K in knee and knight is pronounced in German.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by sam111 View Post
    That must be a joke
    I was kidding/serious

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    Linux Newbie arespi's Avatar
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    Actually, something that helped me to "train my ear" for english was watching TV. My most difficult test was Deff comedy jam. If I could understand what they were saying I think I could understand mostly anything. Also I like to read a lot and it helped me to imprint somehow the structures in my mind, so when I am writing something wrong it just doesnt seems to "look right" so i get the chance to correct it. My pronunciation is terrible mostly for lack of practice, but reading and writing is not so bad, I think.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by arespi
    My most difficult test was Deff comedy jam. If I could understand what they were saying I think I could understand mostly anything.
    Yeah, good one. The Rosetta Stone of cable TV...

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