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  1. #1

    Question Do I have to pay for Linux? Just dont get it!


    I have downloaded Virtualbox (free) and installed opensuse 12.1 (free). Brill

    I now want to install server based linux systems, to test work related products out. The idea being that using virtualbox - free, and a linux os free will help me evaluate products without infringing on os licensing issues....I stress this is not to install a server, stick on a 5 - 10000 user base and then roll out to an entire enterprise, simply, have a virtualbox install image of the linux os, install the necessary products I want to test and can then pass to colleugues for them to evaluate.

    Are any of these products free and would what I am suggesting cause any potential licensing issues?

    AIX 5.3
    AIX 6.1
    LINUX REDHAT EL5/X86_64 64BIT
    LINUX SUSE SLES10/X86_64 64BIT
    LINUX SUSE SLES11/X86_64 64BIT


  2. #2
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
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    You can use Linux completely free of charge, for whatever project you wish. Many distributions are free to obtain and use, but some charge a fee for support, updates and services e.g. Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Suse Linux Enterprise Server. I don't know much about AIX, so can't comment on it.

  3. #3
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    CentOS Linux or Scientific Linux are free rebuilds of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. AIX is an IBM proprietary OS and so not free.
    Should you be sitting wondering,
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    It's Adam Bloody West!


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  5. #4
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Hello and Welcome!

    RHEL and SLED are Enterprise editions. Meaning that they are marketed towards companies that require on-call support for whatever reason.
    So while the software itself can be downloaded free of charge, you'll need to pay for a subscription to receive updates, access to their software repos and any other types of support that you would expect from them.
    On the flip side, you can download either CentOS or Scientific Linux for free. And there is no subscription fee required at all for updates, etc.
    They are both clones of RHEL code, minus some trademark branding and images.
    Jay

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  6. #5
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    I don't want to sound like an Oracle Linux advocate even though i have mentioned them a lot and use both solaris and their linux, cause i 'm not. But they are the same as free ones mentioned. The difference is the Linux itself is free and has a public yum repo, but the online support and other Oracle software are not. They are designed for servers & business, direct competition to the ones you mentioned (AIX, SLES, & RHEL)
    The only catch is you have to register with Oracle which is free too.

    Also are you particularly after a Red Hat based distro or even Linux?
    Would you consider going with a BSD base or Debian based distro?
    Both offer pretty good server software, providing your not using exotic hardware that may not be in the BSD repos.

  7. #6
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Also are you particularly after a Red Hat based distro or even Linux?
    Would you consider going with a BSD base or Debian based distro?
    That's actually a great question!
    That said, a Slackware distro would do quite well. Debian and Slack both are known for their rock hard stability.
    Jay

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  8. #7
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    In regards to licensing, it really depends on the company and your agreement with the company. Because AIX, SLES, Oracle, & RHEL charge subscription fees and only offer a free 30-day evaluation (except Oracle) may mean that when that evaluation period is up, you will either have to choose to subscribe to their support in order to keep it updated or uninstall it.
    Also i think another key issue is that most of those companies will have proprietry software that they do not release to the community and won't allow to be installed past the evalutation period (if that), in order to have a competitive advantage. This will as you probably know will cause issues if your company decides they like that proprietry software but are unwilling to commit to a contract (licence) for whatever reason.

    That in my opinion tells me that if your going to go with a licenced distribution for business use, your business commits to go all the way (once you've found the desired OS) or they don't do it at all and are prepared to make use of the software within community that is free. Half-arsed will as i said just cause you more dilemmas than its probably worth.
    Last edited by SL6-A1000; 12-17-2011 at 04:28 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SL6-A1000 View Post
    Also are you particularly after a Red Hat based distro or even Linux?
    Would you consider going with a BSD base or Debian based distro?
    Both offer pretty good server software, providing your not using exotic hardware that may not be in the BSD repos.
    FreeBSD and Debian are great choices. On the odd occasion that Debian has faltered with an install issue or config problem, FreeBSD has usually come to the rescue. No matter if it's Linux or BSD, if you put together a server for serious stuff then do your homework to make sure your hardware is compatible.

  10. #9
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    CentOS Linux or Scientific Linux are free rebuilds of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. AIX is an IBM proprietary OS and so not free.
    CentOS is one of the most popular systems for cloud computing, web services, financial trading exchanges, etc. Scientific Linux is widely used in university science as well as government research labs (FermiLab, Argonne, CERN, etc) and is maintained by FermiLab in Illinois, and CERN in Switzerland. Both are well supported, dead-bang reliable, and people who have any RHEL experience or certifications find that their skills translate directly to either of these truly free distributions.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  11. #10
    Linux Newbie SL6-A1000's Avatar
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    Unfortenately the founder of Scientific Linux got gobbled up by Red Hat. Damn Red Hat stop eating all the community developers :P.

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